Climbing the Grand Tetons

The Tetons are one of the most famous mountain ranges in the whole of North America. In fact, they're not just mountains, they are icons.

Climbing the Grand Tetons
image: The Epic Grand Tetons mountain range

The Epic Grand Tetons mountain range

Trek Essentials

Where: Northwest Wyoming, USA.
Best season: Autumn is a good cool season to tackle the mighty mountain.
Best sights: Worlds largest elk herd, driking clear mountain spring water.
Remember to bring: Good strong rope and sunblock.

image: Hiking up a steep incline in the Grand Tetons at dusk

Hiking up a steep incline in the Grand Tetons at dusk

The Tetons are one of the most famous mountain ranges in the whole of North America. In fact, they’re not just mountains, they are icons. The largest of them, the Grand Teton, is a classic rock climb and climbers from around the world come to Wyoming to attempt the many climbs in this area. Grand Teton National Park is located in Northwest Wyoming, with Montana to the north and Idaho to the west.

 

Highlights

– Learning new climbing techniques from the numerous climbing guides in the area.

– Hiking through Garnet Canyon and stopping for a drink of clear mountain spring water

– Pushing yourself to actually reach the summit

 

Our Journey Path

image: grand tetons map

Trekker Cristina LaMonica is a novice climber. She prepares for her trip with two days on Exum Guides’ beginner’s training course. The Exum Ridge of the Grand Teton is one of the few routes that even a novice climber can attempt, so along with her guides, that was the route that Cristina chose.

Cristina’s climb starts at the Lupine Meadows Trailhead, where she makes a five-hour hike up through Garnet Canyon. She and her guides spend the night at the Lower Saddle hut, at an elevation of 11,600 feet. At five o’clock in the morning on the next day, Cristina starts her attempt to reach the summit of Grand Teton. She follows the Exum Ridge route and finally reached the plateau near the summit – nearly 14,000 feet!

 

image; Image: Lake in the Grand Teton area

Image: Lake in the Grand Teton area

Survival Tips

Climbing is a dangerous sport and you should never attempt any climb without proper training and guidance. Take a course, do your homework, stay in good shape, but most of all, know your limits!

Even the best climbers don’t go alone. Climb with people you trust. Remember, if there’s an emergency, your life is in their hands.

Check your ropes and all equipment for wear and tear before you start your climb. It’s no good discovering you’ve got a frayed rope when you are halfway up the mountain.

Did you know?

The Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem, which includes the area around the Grand Teton range of mountains and Jackson Hole, supports the largest elk herd remaining in the world. About 4,000 elk spend the summer in Grand Teton National Park.

The Exum Route was first climbed by Glenn Exum in 1931. However, the original route of the first ascent of Grand Teton was the Owen-Spalding route. The first ascent of Grand Teton was accomplished in 1898.

 

MORE INFORMATION

Exum Mountain Guides
Grand Teton National Park
Box 56, Jenny Lake
Moose, Wyoming 83012
USA
Tel: (307) 733 2297
Fax: (307) 733 9613

E-mail address: exum *at* wyoming.com

General travel enquiries:

Wyoming Business Council
Division of Travel and Tourism
Cheyenne, WY 82002
USA
Tel: (307) 777 7777
Fax: (307) 777 6904

Grand Teton National Park
PO Box 170
Moose, Wyoming
83012 USA
Tel: (307) 739 3300
e-mail: grat *at* us-national-parks.net

Planning a Trip:

National Parks Service
Tel: 307 739 3600
www.nps.gov/grte
Rock climbing lessons in the Los Angeles area

The Wilderness Institute Inc.
P.O. Box 238
Auburn, CA 95604
(530) 885-6367
(530) 885-0121 FAX
Email: brad *at* wildernessinstitute.com
Searching for a trained mountain guide?

American Mountain Guides Association
Tel: (303) 271 0984

Many of the guides listed with AMGA work internationally, so if you live outside the U.S., they may still be able to help.

main image: Winter on Grand Teton at center with Mount Owen at right and Nez Perce at left. The Middle and South Teton peaks lie west of Nez Perce, out of view. 

 

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