The Airbnb Bubble: Boom or Bust?

The Airbnb Bubble: Boom or Bust?

Airbnb is undoubtedly one of the most successful stories of a digital industry ‘disrupter’ to quite literally erupt in the last decade. The marketplace has been overwhelmed with the launch of apps such as Netflix in the home entertainment arena; Skype and WhatsApp in telecoms and of course Uber the taxi app. All these applications are about big data, convenience, personalisation and transparency. The buzz words associated with them are ones you are most probably familiar with: smartphones, the cloud, access as opposed to ownership, and scaling up potential. They also have a certain sense of ubiquity, by reformulating a familiar activity, say the trip to your local video store to rent a film, once the technology is adapted, and it’s hard to imagine our lives without the new, improved service.

Context specific service is at the heart of these innovations – as the Airbnb start up story / mythology illustrates so perfectly. In 2007, designers Brian Chesky and Joe Gebbia couldn’t afford the rent on their San Francisco apartment and decided to turn their loft into a lodging space, but, as Gebbia explains, “We didn’t want to post on Craigslist because we felt it was too impersonal. Our entrepreneur instinct said ‘build your own site.’ So we did.” And from there sprang a lifestyle focussed accommodation rental site, enabling folks all over the world to rent out a spare room or their whole property to visitors keen to connect with accommodation options other than the traditional hotel type offerings. It wasn’t long before hoteliers were quaking in their boots and the exponential growth of uptake on the Airbnb way of life means there is unlikely to be any respite for the flailing industry.

Fast forward to 2014 and the platform had 10 million guests and 550,000 properties listed worldwide, along with a $10B valuation—making Airbnb worth more than legacy players like Wyndham and Hyatt.

In March of this year, to signal a true coming-of-age, Airbnb won a contract to provide a reported 20,000 rooms for this year’s Olympic Games in Rio de Janeiro.

Rio de Janeiro, Creative Commons/JorgeBRAZIL

Rio de Janeiro, Creative Commons/JorgeBRAZIL

Already operating in 191 countries and 34,000 cities, financial services analysts predict that by 2020, Airbnb hosts will be taking 500 million bookings a night, rising to one billion by 2025.

In the UK, more than three million people have used the site, while 52,500 people have opened their homes to strangers. A typical host can expect to earn £2,000 in return for renting out a room for 46 nights a year.

Recently, Airbnb executive Jonathan Mildenhall told Adweek that their latest advertising campaign reflects a growing “demand for experiences that are not like the typical tourist experiences that actually more reflect what it’s like to live in local places.”

Ian Wright Iran

Ian Wright hanging out with a family in Iran

With every boom, a bust is often close behind, lurking in the form of competition, tighter regulations or the unexpected affects of success.

The Harvard Business Review calls it Airbnb’s “existential crisis”, visitors get new experiences and bring in money, but as their numbers grow, they “erode the very atmosphere in which they bask and threaten the liveability of the city for residents.”

Only last week, Mark Tanzer, Chief Executive of the Association of British Travel Agents, warned that the popularity of companies such as Airbnb was leading to such an influx of visitors that there was a danger that some of Europe’s most attractive historic cities would be ruined. “If they can’t get around the city you are going to lose value from tourism, even if the numbers are going up,” he said. “Overcrowding in key destinations is becoming a pressing issue. Without controls, we know tourism can kill tourism.”

Even smaller communities are experiencing problems of scale when it comes to Airbnb. Joshua Tree is a tiny town of 7,000 people on the edge of the Joshua Tree National Park in California. It has over 200 available Airbnb rentals. Resident Christine Pfranger observes that “locals are having difficulty finding homes to rent, and are being pushed out of their homes to make way for more vacation rentals.” Another resident adds, “Airbnb and vacation rentals are changing our community…House prices are going up because people now buy houses to rent out as vacation rentals, making it close to impossible for people working in the area to buy a house.”

These Victorian rowhouses are in the Haight-Ashbury neighborhood of San Francisco, California

These Victorian rowhouses are in the Haight-Ashbury neighborhood of San Francisco, California

There are indications that cities are resisting. For instance, the mayors of 10 major markets around the globe are implementing task forces to formulate a united response to the problems adoption of the Airbnb app brings about. Meanwhile, in their hometown of San Francisco, in February 2015, a new rule required Airbnb hosts to register with the city. However, over a year later only about a fifth have done so resulting in the city holding Airbnb accountable for its hosts by imposing a fine on the company of $1,000 per day for each unregistered listing that the city can discover. Of course Airbnb are fighting back by suing the city and they may well win. But this raises the question of what Airbnb’s responsibilities are, if any, to the places their brand appeal of “living like a local” is taken up with most vigour?

It’s an interesting bind Airbnb are now faced with. Hardly the victims of success, far from it, demand for Airbnb signals only growth. Rather, it is the very complex position of facing the beast of accelerated tourism they have unleashed and are now yoked inextricably to.

Calling Globe Trekker Kids

Calling Globe Trekker Kids

You are never too young to hit the road.

Check out this lively little dispatch from Istanbul courtesy of  9 year old Olivia Fanders, filmed and sent to us by her mum, Kelly, on their global tour for Shrek the Musical.

Watch this space for further episodes and check out Kelly’s blog at

http://shrektrekafamilyontour.com  

Travel ‘Appy Part 2: Connect

Travel 'Appy Part 2: Connect

Finding your bearings with the local currency, lingo and lay of the land is always a good idea and these are the apps you need…

CONNECT

Trip Advisor
TripAdvisor has flocked toward rising popularity with its honest user-based reviewers,
all critical of hotels, restaurants, tourist hotspots, and more. The user-based reflections show the
current number of reviews that like or dislike any location destination you’re heading towards. Users
are known to be brutally honest, keeping to their high standards. This gives you a sneak peek into
the best of what your destination has to offer, giving you a better chance for a more enjoyable
vacation.
Available on iPhone (free), Android (free) and Windows Phone (free)

GoogleGoggles
When you’re getting lost in a new city but then come across a famous landmark
you’re unfamiliar with, what do you do? Google has an answer for you, yet again. GoogleGoggles is
an image recognition app that allows you to take pictures of famous landmarks and unknown
products, and will then redirect you to more information about your photograph. You will quickly
become the fascinating world traveller who can offer up historical information in seconds.

Available on iPhone (free) and Android (free)
Convertor Plus

To the avid traveller, converting money is not enough when it comes to visiting a
different country. All different units of measure have to be taken into consideration, which
Convertor Plus accomplishes. Convertor Plus has the most extensive list of currencies and units in
categories such as loan, tip, fuel consumption, temperature, and hundreds of others. This app also
includes a built-in calculator, making splitting the bill easy for once.
Available on iPhone (free) 

iTranslate
The iTranslate app makes translating clear, cut, and concise. iTranslate has continually
kept up with the millennial age as it continually revamps itself with a simplistic style on how to
communicate with other nations. With its ability to convert over 90+ languages, iTranslate can
translate over voice recognition, copied text, phonetic spelling, and much more. It will even speak
back to you with the correct pronunciation.
Available on iPhone (free), Android (free), and Windows Phone (free)

Wi-Fi Finder
Wi-Fi has become a necessity to access since data roaming charges keep rising. Wi-Fi
Finder allows you to look for a Wi-Fi hotspot using your GPS function on your phone. The app will tell
you where the exact location of the Wi-Fi hotspot and how to get there. In over 650,000 locations
and 144 countries, Wi-Fi Finder can help you save your data for real emergencies.
Available on iPhone (free) and Android (free)

Beware the Baggage Squeeze!

Beware the Baggage Squeeze!

For many years now, travellers in Europe have bemoaned the stingy luggage allowances of budget airlines such as Ryanair and EasyJet. But now, airlines are tightening even hand baggage allowances with British Airways reducing the size of a second item passengers can take into the cabin. Be warned!

In the past, those carrying more than allocated cabin baggage allowances have caused controversy. In one incident earlier this summer, a young Scottish man collapsed with heat exhaustion after and needed to be given oxygen on board an EasyJet flight from Stanstead to Glasgow after wearing 12 layers of clothing to avoid paying a 70 dollar excess baggage fee.

Holy Robot Hotels! The Future Has Arrived!!

Holy Robot Hotels! The Future Has Arrived!!

“We will make the most efficient hotels in the world…in the future, we’d like to have more than 90 percent of hotel services operated by robots.”

This is the vision of the service industry that Huis Ten Bosch company President Hideo Sawada shared at a news conference earlier this week  to announce the opening of Henn na Hotel within the Nagasaki Prefecture in Japan.

This is the future of robotics and the future is now…

robotreception

The hotel is fully equipped with a startling array of robotic features such as automated receptionists, including an English-speaking dinosaur and a Japanese-speaking female android, facial recognition technology, rather than keys, is used at check-in and guests have to type their information into a touch panel, porter robots are used by tapping room numbers into their digital panel for delivery, giant robot arm usually seen in manufacturing helps guests store items at the hotel’s cloak room and sensors in the bedroom adjust the room according to body heat and also deliver weather forecasts.

It’s not just the functionality of the hotel that looks to the future, room prices are reasonably low compared to other high end hotels in Japan and potential visitors will have to bid for the price they are willing to pay. The highest one wins, although there will be an upper limit of ¥14,000 for a single room. The park’s founder Hideo Sadawa told reporters that having robot staff at the hotel is no gimmick as he said he wants to show how establishments can improve efficiency and lower labour costs.

The name of the hotel reflects how the hotel will “change with cutting-edge technology,” said a company official, “this is a play on words: “Henn” is also part of the Japanese word for change.”

Exciting times ahead, let’s just hope it turns out rosier than the outcome in the 1973 sci-fi classic Westworld.

westworld

 

 

 

 

 

To make booking your experience at other robot themed places in Japan easier and at best value contact:

GoVoyagin

Dare to bare?

Dare to bare?

When travelling there is always a fine balance to be found between respecting local customs and living out acts of self expression. A perfect instance of this is the act of posing in the nude at famous sites around the world – the latest travel trend to hit the headlines. The hottest spots for the act of exposure are Machu Picchu in Peru and at the Christ the Redeemer statue in Rio de Janeiro.

But this bare skinned affair has become a controversial one after the stunt caused quite a hoopla in Sabah in the northern half of the island of Borneo, part of Malaysia. Photographs of ten backpackers posing in the buff on Mount Kinabulu, including a 33 year old Canadian known as the ‘notorious nudist’ were posted across social media sites angering and upsetting local authorities who accused the group of indecent exposure and indecency.

The mountain has specific holy significance to the indigenious Kadazan and Dusun tribes of the area and feelings of ill-will towards the group quickly spread around the local community. Subsequently five out of the accused ten have been arrested by Malaysian authorities and if found guilty, could face three months in jail.
The British press have, true to their usual fashion, sensationalized the story further by claiming the authorities are charging the group with angering the mountain and thereby causing an earthquake that took place on the mountain last Friday. However, this claim made by the British press is unsubstantiated. Earthquakes in this part of Borneo are rare and tragically twenty-four people lost their lives when the quake sent massive boulders tumbling down the 13,435 ft high mountain.

Photo taken from mynakedtrip.com

The Venice Carnival: Ten Experiences Not to Be Missed

The Venice Carnival: Ten Experiences Not to Be Missed

To one side of you stands a cloaked man, cheering jovially, to the other a woman resplendent in sequins and satins and feathers, dancing to the beat of the music; and beyond – thousands of similarly masked revellers. Where are you? Venice, of course, at its most vibrant and theatrical and romantic of world carnivals.  Author and seasoned reveller – Hannah Fielding shares her top ten Carnival experiences to add to your ‘must do’ list.

Top Tips for Venice Carnival

  1. Book tickets for one of the many Carnival balls – with themes from burlesque to masquerade to enchantment, there’s a party to suit all tastes.
  2. Visit Ca’ Macana, the shop of the best mask maker in Venice. All masks are handmade, and the artistry is exquisite. Buy for yourself one of the classic Carnival masks, such as the Colombina or the Bauta.
  3. Sample a Carnival speciality from one of the street vendors whose wares perfume the air such to make your stomach rumble. The cakes are divine, especially the warm and sweet frittelle Veneziane filled with zabaione cream.
  4. Watch a local beauty pageant winner zip-wire from the Campanile bell tower in the traditional Volo dell’Angelo (Flight of the Angel).
  5. Visit the Arsenale to take in a historical show, live music concerts, street artist performances and, it’s promised, ‘dancing fountains’!
  6. Head to St Mark’s Square to see the parade for the daily Best Masked Costume Competition (enter yourself, if you’re so inclined; the theme is ‘La Natura Fantastica’).
  7. Drink in the romantic atmosphere in St Mark’s Square as you watch sultry tango dancers perform on the Gran Teatro stage.
  8. Brush up on your art history with a free guided tour and talk at the Peggy Guggenheim Collection art museum. This year’s Carnival exhibition is ‘The Empire of Light’.
  9. Embrace the last vestiges of winter with ice-skating in the Campo San Polo. Costume optional!
  10. Join the throngs alongside the Grand Canal for the closing event of the Carnival: a water-borne procession of costumed Venetians on decorated boats and classic gondolas. Be sure to take a camera – this is one spectacle you’ll want to record. (more…)

A Conversation With Globe Trekker Presenter Megan McCormick

A Conversation With Globe Trekker Presenter Megan McCormick

Whenever I need a little escape but can’t get out of town, I fire up an episode or two of “Globe Trekker” so I can live vicariously through the adventures of travellers like Megan McCormick. Since she started hosting the show in 1997, she’s taken viewers to the Greek Islands, Ghana and the Ivory Coast, Micronesia, India, the Silk Road and a host of other exotic locales.

“Globe Trekker,” shown in the U.S. on PBS, is my favourite travel show because it focuses on real travellers experiencing slices of local cultures, not sightseeing. McCormick is my kind of traveller. Her enthusiasm for the places she visits is infectious and you can’t help but conclude that she’d be a fun person to travel with. She got the travel bug in college and has found a way to make a living out of her wanderlust.

McCormick has lived in three U.S. states plus Argentina, Japan, Spain and the U.K., but says she’s now settling down in New York. We spoke to her this week about her favourite places, how she balances family life with her nomadic lifestyle and how she landed her dream job.

Where did you grow up?

I was born in Ohio but I was mostly raised in Florida. I first came to New York when I was 12 and I remember feeling this tremendous sigh of relief because I didn’t really fit in in Florida. I was this gawky, ballet-dancing geek who never went in the sun.

Megan-McCormick-in-PortugalWere you a traveler growing up?

I grew up with a giant map of the world and a subscription to National Geographic. That was my mom’s influence. She had this wonderful wanderlust but we didn’t have the resources to travel very much. I studied abroad in France and after I graduated (with a degree from Boston University in philosophy and political science), I taught English in Japan through the JET program. And that was my first foray into traveling independently.

That was in the mid-’90s after I graduated from college. Then I stayed in Asia and backpacked around the region for almost a year and then I moved to New York. I saved a lot of money teaching in Japan and my dad said I should save that money and come home, but I didn’t do that dad, I didn’t! It’s been very hard for me to grow up and settle down.

Do you have a family?

I do. I’m married with kids now so that’s changed a lot. I have an 8-year-old daughter and a 3-year-old son.
My daughter traveled with me when she was really little and I just kept doing the show. My husband is in television as well, so we would alternate jobs to keep traveling. Then about two years ago, we alighted in Brooklyn and decided to put down roots here for a little while.

What does that mean?

I don’t know. It means we’ve stopped being peripatetic and moving from place to place. When “Globe Trekker” sent me to a location, especially in the early years, I was so excited; I would just stay. The crew would move on after we finished taping but I would stay. I was consistently away. In 2001, I was based in Barcelona and I thought I was missing too many moments in people’s lives, so I moved back to New York. Then I was in Argentina in 2008 for three years.

Megan-enjoying-a-sunset-camel-ride-across-the-Flaming-Moutains-Turpan

Wait a minute. I’m lost. Now you’re in Argentina? Your resume might be even more of a mess than mine.

I more or less backpacked most of the year until 2004 when my daughter was born, but I kept traveling for the first few years. In 2008, we went on vacation to Argentina for six weeks, but decided to stay. We ended up staying (in Mendoza) for three years but that wasn’t really the plan. That’s the beauty of working for yourself.

So how did you transition from backpacker to “Globe Trekker” host?

I had just moved back to New York and I was applying to grad schools for East Asian studies. I was a production assistant for “The News with Brian Williams.” I had some high level duties such as photocopying, ordering supplies and sending faxes. The whole time I was scheming to get out of there. I had a friend who was an actor and he saw this ad in an actor’s magazine announcing an audition for someone who loved to travel.

I’d never been on camera and had never been an actress, so instead of sending a headshot, I sent a collage of photos, kind of like an 8th grade book report. And I wrote a poetic, it’s-the-journey-that-matters kind of thing on the back of it. The director said she had never received a collage before and gave me an audition.

The first audition was great, but on the second one everything went wrong. We were wandering around Chinatown. A cat peed on me. I knocked over a fruit bin. I stumbled across a guy who was painting and he shouted at me like a crazy person and said I was stealing his soul.

It was a disaster but they called and said, “If you can leave in ten days, you’ll have one show and it’s in India.” This was in 1997. I think I’ve done 30-35 shows since then.

Do you know how many countries you’ve been to?

I should know that. My husband and I have a competition to see who’s been to more countries.

Who won?

He’s slightly ahead. He had some hard-to-get-to ones, which was very annoying. He did this great trip from Morocco to Mauritania, down to Nigeria. But I’ve done shows on six continents.

How long do you spend in-country when you’re filming?

We used to shoot for nearly three and a half weeks. But times have changed and budgets have changed. Travel has gotten easier. Now, depending on location, it might be two to three weeks.

And you take your family with you?

My daughter traveled with me until she was older. I’ve only done a few shows since my son was born. My husband would watch the kids while I was working but now he has a grown up job, so the kids stay here. Now that my daughter is in school the nomadic lifestyle is a little more challenging but I still go away every summer. I can’t stay still in the summer.

Megan Diving in MicronesiaOn the show, you stay in a mix of places. Sometimes it’s a $5 per night hostel, other times you’re in a really nice place, right?

It depends on the location. Generally we try to find unique places to stay that are affordable for most people. And those are usually the places that have the most character.

Tell me about one of the dodgier places you’ve stayed in?

A bed is a bed as long as there is nothing crawling in the mattress. I travel with a silk sleeping bag liner, just in case. But I did stay in a very strange, concrete hostel in the middle of nowhere in Inner Mongolia. The bathroom was outside and I went to find it in the middle of the night and I had to dodge two sheep and the bathroom was a hole in the ground over some pigs. There were pigs underneath; there were pigs! That was not a pleasant experience at all.

What are the countries you’re most passionate about?

I love Lebanon so much. And I’m also a big fan of Colombia.

What places do you recommend in Colombia?

I love cities, so I would check out Bogota and Cartagena. And from there, I would go to Santa Marta and then inland up into the mountains. If you like hiking, there is a five- or six-day hike into La Ciudad Perdida, the Lost City. You’re into the jungle and there are indigenous people there who are incredible. And then there’s a beautiful island called Providencia, just off the coast with great beaches.

When you get bad weather do you wait it out or keep shooting?

Sometimes we wait 5-6 days for it to stop raining; other times, we work around it. Ian Wright was in Ireland recently and he said it rained 24 hours a day for days, but they just kept going though. I was in Myanmar for the show about three weeks ago. It’s an amazing country that’s in transition. The people are so lovely. We were there for Burmese New Year. They celebrate by shutting down the country for five days. They have a water festival, where they spray people with water or dump buckets of water on people. You have to have rain gear on because you’re going to get wet.

How many hours a day is the camera trained on you when you’re traveling?

It’s not a reality show so the camera isn’t on me all day long. But we film from sun up to sun down.

Have they ever asked you to wear something or do something that was a little too hokey?

Yes! I would say the entire South-eastern United States program. I think I wore more embarrassing outfits there than everywhere else but it was fun. I was decked out in an antebellum gown walking down some stairs, a Civil War dress, and I was in a cotillion dress dancing with a 16-year-old.

What’s on the horizon for you?

I’m going to Hokkaido in Japan for “Globe Trekker” and I also tried to make my own program, “Sea Nation.” We had a 12-part series where we gave up our normal lives in New York to live on a boat sailing around the Caribbean. It was incredible! We went to 25 different islands and met people from all walks of life. It was 2008, right at the beginning of the economic downturn, and we explored the idea – what can make you happy besides all the things we think will make us happy.

Megan-ChinaYou did this with your kids?

With my daughter, she was 4 at the time. She loved it! My son wasn’t born yet. We were at sea for about four months.

The show was on the Discovery Channel in Asia and a few places in Europe but it never found a home in the U.S. It’s with a sales agent now, so maybe something will happen with it. But there are 11 episodes available online or you can buy the DVD.

Do you consider your job a dream job?

If someone is organizing an opportunity for me to travel and paying me a small amount of money, I will never, ever complain about that. It’s been such a gift. Even the worst days, the day when they made a left instead of a right and we had to stay in the car in a desert for 14 hours, you still get funny stories. I can’t argue with anyone who says it’s a dream job

by Dave Seminara
(Original article appeared in http://www.gadling.com/2013/06/24/travel-dream-jobs-a-conversation-with-globe-trekkers-megan-mcc/)

Globe Trekker Goes to Switzerland!

Globe Trekker Goes to Switzerland!

Chocolates, watches, cheese, famous physicists and beautiful Alpine scenery.  It can only mean one thing!  We are back on the road again and this time we are filming another brand new Globe Trekker episode with Brianna Barnes in…Switzerland!

We’ve got heaps of stories for you fans, from the Alpine Beard festival, the crazy Reideralp cow-pat festival, St Bernard dogs, all-year skiing in Zermatt, Alpine hikes, underground mountain vaults, rare timepieces and the theory of relativity – all packed into one exciting episode.  Not forgetting those quirky things that make the Swiss so memorable.  For instance, did you know owning a gnome is illegal in Zurich and if you try to mow your lawn after 10pm you could face jail time?

So keep you’re eyes peeled for more updates from the Globe Trekker team on the road!

Filming-a-Mountain-Rescue-in-the-Swiss-Alps

Going up in the cable car over the Swiss Alps with Brianna Barnes Photo: Simon Buck

The View from the Cable Car.

The View from the Cable Car Photo: Simon Buck

 

The Winners of this year's Alpine Beard Festival

The winners of this year’s Alpine Beard Festival 2013

The competition was pretty fierce this year!

The competition was pretty fierce this year!

Brianna-&-Charlie-Chaplin-statue

Hanging out with Charlie Chaplin

Interlaken

On top of the world at Interlaeken

The pretty town of Gruyere - home to the famous cheese.

The pretty town of Gruyère – home to the famous cheese.

flower-clock

The Swiss are crazy about timepieces. They even made a floral one!

Cern, Switzerland.  Being a physicist for the day

Cern, Switzerland. Being a physicist for the day

Reideralp-Cow-Festival

Daisy…Daisy…how does your garden grow…?

...By throwing shit all over the mountain.  Quite literally at the Reideralp Cow Pat Festival!

…By throwing shit all over the mountain. Quite literally at the Reideralp Cow Pat Festival! Photo: Simon Buck

You can still ski in the Swiss Alps in summertime - lucky Mountain rescue are still on hand to offer assistance!

You can still ski in the Swiss Alps in summertime – luckily, the Swiss Mountain Rescue team are still on hand to offer assistance!

The Mighty Matterhorn

The Mighty Matterhorn

On the Thomas Cook hiking trail

On the Thomas Cook hiking trail

Found a few Mountain Goats

Found a few Mountain Goats…

Found a couple more!

…Found a couple more!

hiking must have been pretty uncomfortable in the Victorian Days.  This si how Thomas Cook would have looked taking his group around the Alps!

Hiking must have been pretty uncomfortable in the Victorian Days. This is how Thomas Cook would have looked taking his group around the Alps!

filming inside a Swiss Bank in Zurich

Filming inside a Swiss Bank vault in Zurich

He who holds the keys to the bank vault....

He who holds the keys to the bank vault….

9/11 Memorial & Museum

9/11 Memorial & Museum

The new 9/11 memorial and museum on the site of the Twin Towers in New York is nearing completion.

Situated in a newly planted park in the shadow of the soon to be opened Freedom Tower, the memorial takes the form of two giant water features constructed on the site of the foundations of each tower.Water cascades down the sides of the features and then falls into darkened square chasms in the centre.

Embedded on the viewing platform railings on the perimeter of all four sides of each feature are the names of more than 3,000 victims of 9/11. Visitors are encouraged to leave flowers , notes and other mementos.

It remains unclear for now how much it will cost to enter the 9/11 museum but visitors to the 9/11 Memorial are able to for free. However, visitor passes must be reserved in advance on the website.  You can enter the Memorial and also visit a nearby museum which features accounts of 9/11 and relics which include buckled and distorted blown out aircraft cabin window frames.

National September 11 Memorial & Museum at the World Trade Center
One Liberty Plaza, 20th Floor
New York, NY 10006
Tel: 212.312.8800

For information about visiting, email: reservations@911memorial.org, or call 212.266.5211; TTY: 212.266.5212.
For general information, email: info@911memorial.org.

9-11-Memorial-Museum-by-Wally-G-Flickr-creative-commons

 

9-11-Memorial-by-Becksta-flickr-creative-commons

 

9-11-Memorial-by-Tara-Dulva-Flickr-Creative-Commons