World Cities Day: The top cities for millennials to live, work & travel

World Cities Day: The top cities for millennials to live, work & travel

On the occasion of today’s World Cities Day, search engine Nestpick has released a study revealing the top 110 cities for millennials, based on factors such as startup ecosystem, housing affordability, immigration tolerance and quality of nightlife. Nestpick conducted this study, for the second year in a row, in order to pinpoint which cities are successfully attracting this generation, and therefore a core future workforce.

Building on last year’s study, the research encapsulated a wider scope of criteria and sources for the 2018 ranking, including an analysis of top universities and personal freedoms. In addition, the main categories were weighted to reflect the concerns and mindsets of the generation. For example, while housing affordability is a major concern for most, it is even more so for young professionals at the start of their careers. With these interests in mind, 110 cities were analysed taking into consideration four main areas of concern; the business ecosystem, the essentials (housing, food etc.), openness, and recreation.

The top 20 best millennial cities are revealed below. Scores are from 1 to 10, with 10 indicating the highest possible score. The results for each 17 criteria have been combined into four main categories for clarity, but the full results can be seen here.

Results: The Top 20 Cities for Millennials

#

City

Country

Business Ecosystem

The Essentials

Openness

Recreation

Total Score

1

Berlin

Germany

6.1

5.9

8.3

8.8

7.14

2

Montréal

Canada

6.4

5.8

8.6

7.9

7.10

3

London

United Kingdom

8.1

3.5

8.7

7.2

6.71

4

Amsterdam

Netherlands

8.0

3.0

8.5

7.9

6.63

5

Toronto

Canada

6.6

5.3

9.0

5.5

6.60

6

Vancouver

Canada

7.1

4.4

9.0

4.9

6.34

7

Barcelona

Spain

5.5

5.2

6.8

8.5

6.31

8

New York City

USA

8.8

2.9

6.7

7.5

6.25

9

Cologne

Germany

3.2

6.0

7.8

8.0

6.17

10

Manchester

United Kingdom

5.0

5.1

8.5

6.1

6.12

11

Hamburg

Germany

5.9

4.2

7.1

7.9

6.10

12

Bristol

United Kingdom

5.7

4.9

8.1

5.7

6.06

13

San Francisco

USA

8.9

2.8

7.0

6.2

6.04

14

Austin

USA

8.1

4.0

6.4

6.0

6.03

15

Paris

France

6.9

3.3

7.0

7.6

5.98

16

Miami

USA

8.4

2.5

6.2

7.6

5.90

17

Munich

Germany

4.7

4.5

7.8

7.0

5.87

18

Lisbon

Portugal

4.5

6.0

5.9

7.3

5.84

19

Glasgow

United Kingdom

5.0

6.3

7.7

3.8

5.82

20

Madrid

Spain

3.2

6.1

6.7

7.6

5.82

These final results reveal the best overall cities for millennials, based on all four factors, but by looking at the top 10 cities for each individual category, the results indicate which location would be best for a young person based on their strongest concerns.

For example, those millennials looking for an adventure or experience abroad should focus on the Essentials Top 10, which looks at factors such as housing, food, internet, and transport, which are all important for short-term movers, while employment or openness might not be such a primary concern. Likewise, young professionals looking for work opportunities should focus instead on the Business Ecosystem Top 10.

The tables below reveal the top 10 cities for millennials based on each larger category:

Top 10 Cities for Business Ecosystem

Top 10 Cities for The Essentials

#

City

Country

#

City

Country

1

San Francisco

USA

1

Seoul

South Korea

2

New York City

USA

2

Taipei

Taiwan

3

Kuala Lumpur

Malaysia

3

Bangkok

Thailand

4

Miami

USA

4

Brno

Czech Republic

5

Los Angeles

USA

5

Bucharest

Romania

6

Seattle

USA

6

Prague

Czech Republic

7

Beijing

China

7

Porto

Portugal

8

London

United Kingdom

8

Mexico City

Mexico

9

Portland

USA

9

Budapest

Hungary

10

Austin

USA

10

Guadalajara

Mexico

Top 10 Cities for Openness

Top 10 Cities for Recreation

#

City

Country

#

City

Country

1

Helsinki

Finland

1

Buenos Aires

Argentina

2

Toronto

Canada

2

Berlin

Germany

3

Vancouver

Canada

3

Barcelona

Spain

4

London

United Kingdom

4

Cologne

Germany

5

Oslo

Norway

5

Amsterdam

Netherlands

6

Copenhagen

Denmark

6

Montréal

Canada

7

Montréal

Canada

7

Hamburg

Germany

8

Amsterdam

Netherlands

8

Bogotá

Colombia

9

Manchester

United Kingdom

9

Bangkok

Thailand

10

Stockholm

Sweden

10

Rio de Janeiro

Brazil

Further findings:

  • Beijing, China ranks highest for Employment, followed by American cities San Francisco and Austin.

  • New York City, USA has the highest score for their Startup ecosystem, followed by San Francisco, USA and London, UK.

  • Hong Kong, China ranks highest for Tourism, followed by Bangkok, Thailand and London, UK.

  • Guadalajara, Mexico has the highest score for Housing, followed by fellow Mexican city Monterrey and Medellín, Colombia.

  • Bangkok, Thailand ranks highest for Food, followed by Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia and Lima, Peru.

  • Oslo, Norway has the highest score for Transport, followed by Washington D.C., USA and Paris, France.

  • Japanese cities Tokyo and Osaka rank joint highest for Health, followed by Singapore, Singapore.

  • Seoul, South Korea has the highest score for Internet Speed, followed by Bergen, Norway and Denver, USA.

  • London, UK ranks highest for Universities, followed by Paris, France and Seoul, South Korea.

  • China and Hong Kong rank highest for Access to Contraception, followed by the UK.

  • Norway ranks highest for Gender Equality, followed by Finland and Sweden.

  • New Zealand ranks highest for Immigration Tolerance, followed by Canada and Norway.

  • Amsterdam, Netherlands has the highest score for Personal Freedom and Choice, followed by Oslo, Norway and Helsinki, Finland.

  • Madrid, Spain ranks highest for LGBT Friendliness, followed by Amsterdam, Netherlands and Toronto, Canada.

  • Berlin, Germany has the highest score for Nightlife, followed by Paris, France and Melbourne, Australia.

  • Beijing, China ranks highest for Beer prices, followed by Colombian cities Medellín and Bogotá.

  • Miami, USA has the highest score for Festivals, followed by fellow American city Washington D.C. and Paris, France.

Want to learn more about your favourite world cities? Watch how other people live as our travellers guide you through the cultural and aesthetic delights of some the world’s most renowned cities in our series Bazaar.

 

Introducing: The Grand Egyptian Museum

Introducing: The Grand Egyptian Museum

Ever since its foundation in 1902, the Museum of Egyptian Antiquities in central Cairo has been famous as one of the world’s greatest museums, containing an astonishing wealth of artifacts, including the spectacular golden treasures found in 1922 during the excavation of King Tutankhamen’s tomb, perhaps the world’s greatest ever archaeological discovery.

The museum’s time as the world’s greatest museum of Egyptian antiquities, however, is soon about to end, as a brand-new Egyptian museum is on the verge of opening in Giza, close to the pyramids.

The Grand Egyptian Museum, due to open to the public in 2019, will display the greatest treasures currently on show in the old Cairo Museum, plus much much more. Only the most spectacular objects found in Tutankhamen’s tomb, for example, were on display in the old Cairo Museum, while the vast majority were kept in storage, unseen by the general public. For the first time, once the new Grand Egyptian Museum opens, all of the more than 5000 objects found in Tutankhamen’s tomb will be on display, alongside countless other remarkable ancient Egyptian treasures. The 5.2-million-square-foot structure will become the world’s largest museum devoted to a single civilisation.

Interested in all things Egyptian history? Watch our episode Empire Builders: Egypt to learn more about one of the world’s earliest and greatest civilisations.

Estonia is named the best alternative holiday destination in Europe

Estonia is named the best alternative holiday destination in Europe

The European summer may be over, but British holidaymakers are taking more holidays than at any point in the past five years. With many already planning their next break of the year, a relaxing holiday on the beach just doesn’t cut it any more. With so much choice and flexibility, travellers are on the hunt for something – and somewhere – as unique as they are. With city breaks being the top holiday type of choice last year, followed by beach holidays, alternative destinations are constantly emerging as travellers search for more authentic experiences.

To uncover what makes British holiday makers tick, ebookers have conducted research into some of the most popular European countries, analysing each destination and ranking them on a variety of factors to produce the Alternative Holiday Index.

The Alternative Holiday Index ranks 31 cities across Europe by analysing 24 factors including:

  • Arts and culture
  • Authentic food
  • Interesting architecture
  • Cheap Beer
  • Good for solo travellers
  • Friendly locals

Combined and weighted, they produce an overall index score for each country. So which destination came out on top?

Top 10 alternative holiday destinations in Europe

1

Estonia best alternative holiday destination in Europe!

Known for its untouched nature, medieval architecture, and Nordic food, Estonia is revealed to be home of the best alternative holiday destination in Europe.

Located in Northern Europe, Estonia was ranked highly for its interesting architecture scoring nine out of ten, which may come as no surprise as Estonia’s capital Tallinn is known as the best-preserved medieval city in Northern Europe.

Estonia’s vast woodland meant the country ranked highly within the ‘natural beauty and exploration’ category with an index score of ten out of ten.

Estonia also ranked highly for its ‘Instragrammability’ (10/10), authentic high-quality food (10/10), and friendly locals (10/10).

Estonia was followed by Lithuania and Latvia as the best alternative holiday destinations with index scores of 195.6 and 180.9 respectively.

The Alternative Couples Destination

Lithuania ranks particularly high for authentic food (9), nature (10) and romantic settings (9), making it the perfect destination for couples in search of outdoor adventure, great food, and cheap beer (9.13).

Situated between Lithuania and Estonia, Latvia ranks highly across the index – with high index scores for interesting architecture (9), arts and culture (8.71), and ‘Instagrammable’ surroundings (8.71).

Cyprus offers a home from home

The research also reveals the European countries which are perfect for those looking for something a little more within their comfort zone; a home away from home!

Cyprus ranks the highest out of the 32 countries for the ease of finding British food, pubs and home comforts (7.12) and for having a high number of fellow Brits visiting the country (6) each year. However, it is not the best country to visit if you can’t function without a good cuppa, only scoring 5.57 on the index.

Authentic experiences

On the other end of the spectrum and those looking for an authentic experience in another country’s culture, central and northern Europe offer the best destinations with Slovenia and Slovakia.

Estonia and Slovenia are ideal alternative holiday destinations for Brits wanting to lose themselves in another countries culture and not run the risk of bumping in to fellow Brits. With both countries scoring low in the research for the number of British visitors, travellers can really escape and experience something completely new.

Going solo? Best destinations for going it alone

Google trends reveals searches for ‘solo travel’ have increased steadily year on year with queries around ‘travel alone’ peaking in January this year and more people than ever before consider an adventure of a lifetime on their own.

The new research questioned solo travellers on each locations suitability for travelling alone with a key focus on safety and relevant activities.

Estonia is again the highest rated country in Europe for those looking to explore the world on their own.

2

 

Egypt upset by ignored obelisk gifted to Britain 200 years ago

Egypt upset by ignored obelisk gifted to Britain 200 years ago

The Economist has reported that Egyptian authorities are upset at Britain’s seeming indifference to a gift presented to the country 200 years ago.

It’s a giant 3500-year-old obelisk that sits unloved in an obscure section of the Embankment in London .

The Egyptian Antiquities Department now says that unless Britain shows greater appreciation and care of the monument, they should give it back.

Western powers, going right back to the Roman Empire, sought out and often plundered Egyptian obelisks. They can be found centre stage in a number of European capitals including Paris and Rome.

But the Egyptians say London’s Egyptian obelisk has been poorly maintained and ignored. Bomb damage in the Second World War wasn’t even repaired .

Check out our stories on Egypt’s spectacular obelisks in Empire Builders: Ancient Egyptians, Empire Builders: The Roman Empire and Tough Boats: Egypt Down the Nile.

Thomas Cole: The Course of the Empire

Thomas Cole: The Course of the Empire

British-American artist, Thomas Cole, was largely inspired by great British artists, Turner and Constable. And like many artists in the early 19th century, he took The Grand Tour of Italy and the Mediterranean to visit the great sites of the Ancient world, rediscovering the incredible ruins of Rome, Athens and beyond.

Cole had grown up in the midst of the Industrial Revolution in Northern England, witnessing the dramatic changes it inflicted on society. He would paint that story and it was a theme he revisited again in his new home on America’s East Coast where he emigrated with his family at the age of 17 in 1818.

The United States was in the throes of rapid industrialisation and change, and Cole – who was instrumental in the establishment of the Hudson River School – yearned for a natural world where bucolic landscapes lay undisturbed by progress

These themes, the influence of Turner and Constable and his wonder for the ancient world, would form the basis of Cole’s greatest work: The Course of Empire. Its five canvasses depict the foundation, growth, celebration, collapse and eventual ruin of a mythical empire. It’s a universal story repeated through the ages.

Browse The Course of Empire gallery below and check out our 10 part series, Empire Builders, which charts the growth, power and eventual collapse of 10 of the world’s great empires.

Desolation, 1836

Desolation, 1836

Destruction, 1836

Destruction, 1836

The Consummation of Empire, 1834

The Consummation of Empire, 1834

The Pastoral or Arcadian State, 1834

The Pastoral or Arcadian State, 1834

The Savage State, 1834

The Savage State, 1834

Watch the Empire Builders trailer!

The world’s first film made by an airline and an airport

The world’s first film made by an airline and an airport

Finnair and Helsinki Airport have been connecting East and West for 35 years via Helsinki. To celebrate this achievement, the two have released a short film, the first one of its kind – made by an airline and an airport. The short film East and West Side Story speaks of meaningful encounters that take place when people travel.

East and West Side Story follows a famous writer in need of personal privacy, while the whole world wants to have her in the limelight. The story plays on three continents, spacing from the US to Korea and ending in Finland. As the film’s title East and West Side Story suggests, the film has two directors:  Young-Wok Paik aka “Wookie” comes from Korea and Johan Storm from Sweden. The two directors both give their point of view on the same story, produced by B-Reel Films (Bergman: a Year in Life). The leading roles are played by Anne Bergstedt (Boardwalk Empire, Black Swan) and Jae Hoon (One Day Maybe).

The short film premiered last week in a special event at Helsinki Airport, where an aircraft hangar was turned into a movie theatre for one night. The guests were hosted by Renny Harlin, the established Hollywood filmmaker and one of the most sought-after directors in China.

Watch the film below!

Life cycle assessment vs comfort? Guests’ influence on sustainable hotel practices

Life cycle assessment vs comfort? Guests’ influence on sustainable hotel practices

“The guest is king” – a principle providing great comfort for hotel guests. Nevertheless, wishes and demands by guests can impact hotel practices strongly in some cases. The life cycle assessment, in particular, can suffer from guests’ longing for alleged comfort: coffee machines with aluminum capsules, daily towel exchange, and single-packaged hygiene products. Below, we find out from some partner Green Pearls® partner hotels how to deal with the challenge of keeping guests’ requests and the sustainable alignment balanced.

No benefits for the environment

In many hotels you can find various environmentally harmful practices. A common example is coffee machines with aluminum capsules. Aluminum is the most energy-intensive metal to be processed and the capsules produce heaps of waste – thus, they are anything but eco-friendly and energy-efficient. Exchanging towels and linens daily is gradually declining – even in hotels that are not explicitly sustainable. A good thing since laundry uses up many resources, and, besides, when the textiles consist of synthetic materials micro fibers detach while washing and pollute the oceans. Minibars such as small refrigerators are energy-wasting and small snack packs, single-wrapped soaps and disposable toothbrushes produce excessive trash. In addition, care products and cleaning detergents often contain liquid or micro plastics.

Handtuchwechsel © Green Pearls

Handtuchwechsel © Green Pearls

Alternate ways exist…

Current trends show that guests increasingly demand sustainable actions from hotels and also provide suggestions to the hotel to become (more) eco-friendly. Even though the Green Pearls® hotels are pioneers in terms of sustainability and environmental protection, dedicated guests can be found recurrently. Guests at the hotel SCHWARZWALD PANORAMA are asked to fill in questionnaires about eco-friendly improvements in the hotel. If these are feasible, the hotel does implement them. Due to the guest’s ideas, recycled toilet paper was introduced and plastic straws were banned, among other things.

© SCHWARZWALD PANORAMA

© SCHWARZWALD PANORAMA

Consistent for the climate

In the Hotel Speicher am Ziegelsee, guests repeatedly criticise the lack of coffee machines and minibars in the rooms. According to the guests, minibars, in particular, should not be missing at a 4-star hotel. However, the eco-hotel thinks differently: “You must remain consistent,” emphasises the managing director Christian Petersen the hotel’s persistence. The business hotel cannot be misled by guests’ complaints to protect its climate-neutral status. Instead of minibars, a 24-hour room service for drinks is available at the hotel Speicher am Ziegelsee. On the contrary, environmentally conscious vacationers praise and support the hotel’s consistent sustainable philosophy and climate-friendly projects.

Blick vom See auf das Hotel © Hotel Speicher am Ziegelsee

Blick vom See auf das Hotel © Hotel Speicher am Ziegelsee

Communication as a solution

Communication can prevent dissatisfied guests in many cases. The hotel SCHWARZWALD PANORAMA provides an example: Many environmentally conscious guests used the “Do Not Disturb” sign to signal that neither their room should be cleaned nor the towels be exchanged. Though a good idea, but the room service cleaned those rooms later that day, since the sign does not explicitly concern the room cleaning. Meanwhile, printed lavender bags for the doorknob make it easier to communicate: “No room cleaning today!” Moreover, the Creativhotel Luise applies multi-layered communication during the sustainable renovation to inform its guests and avoid complaints that way: banners outside, information boards in the hotel, gift boxes including letters and small presents as compensation.

Frisches Obst © Leitlhof

Frisches Obst © Leitlhof

Preventing complaints with sustainable services

In the eco-hotel Leitlhof in the Dolomites guests have not yet complained about sustainable initiatives or provided ideas for improvements. However, the hotel always communicates its environmentally conscious goals in person on site to prevent misunderstandings. In addition, all emails contain the note to avoid the printout to save paper. Furthermore, guests are also informed about alternative, sustainable services to prevent complaints: instead of a minibar, guests are offered tea and fresh fruits daily, and a shuttle service takes them to the city and the slopes.

Bach im Wald © SCHWARZWALD PANORAMA

Bach im Wald © SCHWARZWALD PANORAMA

Rethinking complaints

Before complaining about something, one might rethink if the demand is inevitable: a coffee machine in the room appears superfluous when it is available at the breakfast buffet. A plentifully covered buffet is a delight for the guest, though it produces lots of leftovers at the same time. If everyone is a bit more humble, it will be a big step for the wellbeing of our environment. The solution is to act more consciously, as recognised by Stephan Bode from the SCHWARZWALD PANORAMA: “We are not only aware of our role as a host, but we have understood that our company is the guest of our host the Earth. Therefore, I see myself less as managing director and owner, but rather interpret my role as guardian of the guest-house SCHWARZWALD PANORAMA.”

More Information

Green Pearls

Interested in learning more about cool, innovative or just downright quirky hotels around the world? From the bizarrely themed to the bizarrely constructed, Globe Guides Extreme Hotels brings you the world’s maddest collection of overnight stays on the planet.

British Explorers: The Mausoleum of Sir Richard Burton

British Explorers: The Mausoleum of Sir Richard Burton

The Mausoleum of Sir Richard and Lady Burton (pictured above) is a Grade II listed tent-shaped mausoleum of Carrara marble and Forest of Dean stone in the churchyard of St Mary Magdalen Roman Catholic Church Mortlake located in London.

burton-gravesiteSir Richard Burton, who died in 1890, was an explorer, geographer, translator, writer, soldier, orientalist, cartographer, ethnologist, spy, linguist, poet, fencer, and diplomat. He was famed for his travels and explorations in Asia, Africa and the Americas, as well as his extraordinary knowledge of languages and cultures. According to one count, he spoke 29 European, Asian and African languages.

Burton’s best-known achievements include a well-documented journey to Mecca in disguise, at a time when Europeans were forbidden access on pain of death; and a journey with John Hanning Speke as the first Europeans to visit the Great Lakes of Africa in search of the source of the Nile.

Do you love learning about famous explorers throughout history? Watch our mini series The Lost World of Joseph Banks.

 

Legal Cannabis in California

Legal Cannabis in California

Any visitor to Californian cities, such as Los Angeles, can’t help but notice the proliferation of shops selling cannabis legally to the public. In addition, a number of industries have sprung up to support this growth.

Here are ten questions answered about California’s legal cannabis boom.

1. Why has it happened?

California has always been known as being amongst the most socially progressive states in America, so its relaxed laws on cannabis come as little surprise. Indeed, cannabis has been decriminalised in California since 1975 before being legalised for medicinal purposes in 1996. Thus, there has been much precedent for cannabis’ complete legalisation in 2018. Due to these long-term relaxed laws, cannabis has been a major part of Californias cultural identity. Even prior to the complete legalisation of cannabis, the state has been generally accepting of recreational marijuana use. Thus, the legalisation of cannabis in California is a culmination of its cultural and legal history within the state in addition to the significant potential economic benefits. 

2. What is the extent of the boom in shops selling cannabis?

Prior to the official legalisation of cannabis at the beginning of 2018, cannabis was available for medicinal use through dispensaries. These are prevalent throughout the state. Since legalisation, however, there has been a considerable uptick in cannabis-associated businesses covering a number of different brands. Due to the robust infrastructure already in place from the medicinal marijuana industry, it has been very easy for recreational cannabis sellers to rise up quickly. There are currently 261 separate dispensaries in addition to many more medicinal dispensaries. The only state with more dispensaries is Oregon, where cannabis has been legal for a longer period of time. None of these dispensaries have permanent licenses yet, instead being endowed with temporary ones. In addition to dispensaries, a number of other businesses have emerged including delivery services such as Eaze and dispensary locator apps. A full-fledged, sophisticated industry has emerged surrounding the cannabis industry.

3. What do these shops sell? Are there different types of cannabis reflecting brands and strengths?

Cannabis products in California are divided into four major categories: Flowers, Concentrates, Edibles and Applications. Flowers refer to the marijuana plant itself – dried buds, which are by far the most popular form of cannabis consumption. There are hundreds of different varieties of strains, each slightly different from the other. Concentrates refer to a number of different products created through the extractions of trichome from marijuana plants. Trichomes are the small, shiny crystals found on mature plants. These are generally stronger than flowers and are made into a number of different products including wax and oils. These are most often consumed through the use of a vape pen, a more inconspicuous means of consumption. Edibles, as their name indicates, refer to food items incorporated with cannabis extractions. These often have more of a delayed effect than other means of consumption. Applications are a more medicinal means of consumption, containing high doses of CBD in the forms of patches used to alleviate physical pain or mental disorders such as anxiety. 

Cannabis is divided into two main forms – Sativa and Indica, with hybridised forms of the two also being available. Sativa strains are known for being more cerebral effects with a higher THC content whereas Indica strains are known for their more sedate effects and have a higher CBD content. 

4. Is the cannabis sold for medicinal purposes?

cannabis-in-california-by-pilot-productionsCannabis has a number of medicinal functions and has been legal in California for medicinal purposes in the state of California since 1996. There has been evidence to suggest that cannabis has beneficial effects in alleviating pain and nausea for those suffering from illnesses such as cancer, HIV/AIDS and even multiple sclerosis. Its use for mental disorders is more inconclusive such as PTSD, anxiety and depression. Cannabis can have adverse effects, including cognitive impairment and psychosis. However, these effects differ from person to person. Its medicinal purposes, while they doubtlessly exist, are not supported by overwhelming evidence due to laws over its legality restricting research. 

5. What are the legal issues?

As of the beginning of 2018, cannabis is legal for recreational use in the state of California. Despite this, there are still certain restrictions in place regarding its consumption and distribution. Users of cannabis must be over the age of 21, the same as alcohol. Furthermore, like alcohol, consumption is legally prohibited in public spaces and there is a penalty of a $100 fine for those who do this. Cannabis in excess of one ounce must be privately stored in ones residential property away from a public space. There is a limit of six plants at any one residence. Consumption of cannabis while driving is also illegal, as is possession within a school area. 

6. Is there a similar boom in the number of growers?

Cannabis plantations can be found throughout the entire state, although production is mainly in the region of Northern California nicknamed the Emerald Triangle. Prior to legalisation, a vast network of authorised growers were active, producing vast quantities of cannabis for medicinal consumption. Following legalisation, the law allowing adults to grow up to six plants within their own residence has been ratified. There are no limits to the amount those growing marijuana for medicinal purposes, although these laws are rumoured to change. There are over 68,000 cannabis cultivators in California, although fewer than 1% of these are licensed. Many growers have struggled to adapt to the new regulations of cannabis production. Despite the legalisation, a black market still remains intact. 

7. How is cannabis taxed? Is it a revenue earner for the government?

Since legalisation, a number of different taxes have been imposed upon the emerging cannabis industry. In the first quarter of 2018, the California State Government collected $60 million in tax from cannabis, well below expectations. The excise tax generated $32 million. Cultivation tax comprised $1.6 million while the sales tax comprised the remaining $27.3 million. Despite falling short of initial predictions, cannabis is projected to generate a considerable tax windfall for the Californian government in the coming years. Prices are increasing from an average of $54 per ounce to $65 per ounce. 

8. Is big business getting involved?

There are so far 6,000 licensed cannabis businesses operating within California. A wealth of start-ups have emerged in tech hotspots such as Silicon Valley and Los Angeles in addition to boutique businesses. Larger conglomerates, having sensed the industrys highly lucrative potential, have gotten involved. This development has left a number of smaller operations concerned, with there being government motions drawn up to protect small-level businesses from being put out of businesses. Despite this, given the ripe potential for the cannabis industry, it is only a matter of time before major companies become more intimately involved. With taxes driving up prices, wealthy companies may look to combat this by flooding the market and dominating supply and demand. This will drive small businesses out of work or alternatively consolidate them.

9. What other states and counties allow cannabis for sale? 

cannabis-in-california-by-pilot-productions-1Currently, cannabis is legal for recreational use in 9 US states – Alaska, California, Colorado, Maine, Massachussetts, Nevada, Oregon, Vermont and Washington as well as in the District of Columbia. With the exception of Vermont and the District of Columbia wherein the commercialisation of cannabis is prohibited, the laws are generally the same between these states. An additional 13 states have decriminalised recreational marijuana use. Furthermore, medicinal marijuana is legal in 31 states. Indeed, only in 3 states – Idaho, Kansas and South Dakota – is cannabis consumption entirely illegal. Despite this, cannabis use and possession is classified as illegal under federal law, which causes conflict and confusion over laws surrounding the drug throughout the country.

Outside of the United States, only three countries have legalised recreational cannabis use – Canada, Georgia and Uruguay. However, a wealth of countries around the world have decriminalised cannabis or have some form of medicinal marijuana laws. Portugal and Spain are well-known for their relaxed laws and the Netherlands is particularly well-known for its cannabis culture. While it is not legal all across the country, in certain areas such as the capital city Amsterdam, it is legal to consume cannabis within coffee shops. This style of cannabis culture differs from the more heavily-regulated one which exists in California and elsewhere in the United States.

10. Can anybody buy cannabis? What documents do you need to produce when purchasing?

Cannabis is available to purchase for those who are over the age of 21, producing a valid form of ID such as a passport or a drivers license. In regards to medicinal marijuana, customers must be over the age of 18. Since the legalisation as of the beginning of 2018, it is legal for non-citizens to buy and consume, although it remains federally illegal.

Interested in all things Californian and revolutionary? In our Metropolis – Los Angeles episode presenter Charlie Luxton learns that LA’s unique architectural legacy stemmed from a freedom afforded no-where else on earth. In many ways, this was a city where anything goes, and did. Here, revolutionary ideas were tried and tested with spectacular results.

Captain Cook continues to inspire travel habits

Captain Cook continues to inspire travel habits

As the 26th of August marked the 250th anniversary of Captain Cook’s maiden round the world voyage, take a look at some of the amazing destinations that were discovered on this epic journey.

Departing from Plymouth in 1778, Cook and his 100-strong crew embarked on the trip of a lifetime that would have even today’s jet-setters jealous.

Madeira, Portugal 

This tiny island off the coast of Portugal, rising out of the Atlantic’s waves, was the first stop of the Endeavour. The iconic harbour of the island’s capital, Funchal – with its dazzling firework displays and botanical gardens – will be sure to keep you entertained. The island is also famed for its wineries, its sports fans and the CR7 Museum is also a must see!

madeira-portugal

Rio De Janeiro, Brazil  

Cook used Rio De Janeiro as a supply stop, but travellers today will take in the sights of Copacabana Beach, Christ the Redeemer and shimmy to some Samba Music. Revellers will also marvel at the views from Sugarloaf Mountain or party the days and nights away in Rio’s carnival atmosphere. One thing’s for certain, Rio is a far cry from the days of Captain Cook.

rio-de-janeiro-brazil

Tierra Del Fuego, Argentina 

When Cook ventured ashore at Tierra Del Fuego, he described the locals as, “the most miserable group of people on the planet”. Tierra Del Fuego truly could be ‘The End of the World’. But nowadays, travellers are blown away by the staggering scenery offered at the gateway to Antarctica. The snowy mountains and glaciers are timeless or visit Ushuaia’s busy port and take a boat trip to Penguin Isle.

tierra-del-fuego

Tahiti, French Polynesia

Just the thought of Tahiti brings images of palm trees and sandy beaches. In fact, when it was time for Cook’s voyage to leave the island, two of his crew attempted to desert, due to falling for local women. The Polynesian hospitality and staggering natural scenery will make you fall in love with this little piece of paradise in the Pacific.

tahiti

New Zealand

When Cook first arrived on the coast of New Zealand, he was greeted by the Maori people and the Haka. Nowadays, the traditional war dance can be experienced by watching the world famous All Blacks rugby team. New Zealand is one of the world’s most popular tourist destinations, and it’s not hard to understand why. The ultra-modern city of Auckland, the beautiful 15,000-kilometres coastline, and of course, the scenery and landscape that made Lord of the Rings possible.

new-zealand

Australia

When Cook landed at Stingray, New Holland, as the land Down Under was known back in 1770, he can’t have known that just 250 years later, the area would be home to the Sydney Opera House, Sydney Harbour Bridge and some of the most amazing beaches on the planet.

sydney

Jakarta, Indonesia 

Indonesia’s capital was the port where the Cook’s ship, the Endeavour, received repairs after damaging itself on the Great Barrier Reef. Back then, it was part of the Dutch East Indies, but now, it could be one of the most multicultural spots on the planet. Javanese? Arabic? Malay? European? You name it, there is some part of the culture in Jakarta! Visit the old town for a taste of what Cook experienced when he sailed to this former Dutch Colony.

jakarta

Cape Town, South Africa

Cook’s final stop on his epic voyage, Cape Town, sits on the Cape of Good Hope. Dramatic cliffs, table top mountain and Robben Island – the prison that held Nelson Mandela for 25 years – are tourist hotspots for visiting holiday makers. Cape Town can truly be seen as one of Africa’s jewels, and no true around the world voyage can be completed without seeing this incredible city.

cape-town-bo-kaap-south-africa

More Information

Kiwi.com

To replicate Captain Cook’s journey, check out the Nomad feature on this travel website.

Love learning about famous explorers throughout history? Watch our mini series The Lost World of Joseph Banks.