City Escapes: Suffolk

Suffolk is one of England’s most traditional counties. Predominantly comprised of low lying and flat farming countryside, with a picturesque coast on the North Sea, its a favourite weekend getaway spot for Londoners.

City Escapes: Suffolk

Suffolk is situated north east of London and borders the counties of Essex, to to south, Norfolk ,to the north, and Cambridgeshire, to the west.

A train from London’s Liverpool Street connects to Ipswich and there are further regional connections into its many pretty market towns such as Woodbridge, Bury St Edmunds or Sudbury.

Here are our six favourite spots to visit on a short getaway to Suffolk…

Southwold

Southwold is famous for its pier, picturesque coastline and traditional beach huts. Nearby Warberswick is a smaller and quieter destination with similar charms. You will find artisanal ice-cream and suffolk beer a-plenty in Southwold.

Southwold Beach Huts

Southwold Beach Huts

Aldeburgh

Aldeburgh is a smaller and quieter coastal rival to Southwold. This pretty seaside town sits on a long stretch of pebble beach and has a quaint Main Street, complete with one of Britain’s most famed Fish & Chip shop. It offers great coastal and inland walks. The walk to Snape Maltings, famous for its concert hall which was originally a barley processing plant, and adopted by composer Benjamin Britten, takes you through wheat fields, forest and marshland ending at the fantastic setting of the renovated Snape Maltings complex. Pause for a coffee or ice cream, take in the view and admire the sculptures for British artists, Henry Moore and Barbara Hepworth.

Aldeburgh has a quiet pebble beach

Aldeburgh has a quiet pebble beach

Orford

This picturesque coastal village offers stunning remote coastal walks and an 12th century castle built by Henry II in 1165. Orford is known to Londoners for producing some fantastic seafood and quality smoked fish produce, and is also home to the talented Pump Street Bakers and Chocolate Makers, another delightful staple in delicatessens across the capital.

The coast at Orford

The coast at Orford

The Lost City of Dunwich

Dunwich, known as the lost city of England, dates back to Anglo-Saxon times and once stood proud as the capital of the Kingdom of East Anglia. Dunwich was abandoned in the medieval period due to a series of brutal North Sea storms and coastal erosion. Its ghostly ruins and nearby forest and heath walks offer a brooding and bucolic escape for ramblers.

Beautiful fields of Heather at Dunwich

Beautiful fields of Heather at Dunwich

Framlingham

Mentioned in the Domesday Book and home town of singer Ed Sheeran, this ancient market town is worth a visit alone for its famous Norman castle, built in 1148, and made even more famous by Sheeran’s hit “Castle on the Hill“. Market on Tuesdays and Saturdays offering delightfully local produce among other vintage, craft and handmade goodies.

Framlingham Castle

Framlingham Castle

Lavenham

Lavenham is often touted as one of England’s best preserved Medieval villages. With it’s slightly creepy leaning medieval buildings and its narrow brick lanes, this village has been the backdrop for many medieval movie scenes. In fact, Harry Potter fans will recognise Lavenham as Godrick’s Hollow! There are some truly opulent options for dining in Lavenham and the surrounding area, along with boutique hotels and quintessential tea-rooms.

The Swan, Lavenham, Suffolk, Amanda Slater, Flickr Creative CommonsThe Swan at Lavenham, Suffolk, Amanda Slater, Flickr Creative Commons

 

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