Italian Island Of Capri Bans Single Use Plastics

Italian Island Of Capri Bans Single Use Plastics

Capri has become the latest Italian resort to introduce a ban on single use plastics, and are imposing hefty fines of up to 500 Euros on anyone seen using any disposable and non-compostable plastics. The move not only targets the mass-tourism that the Island sees over the summer months, but also beach vendors selling goods accompanied with plastic cups, plates and cutlery, and plastic carrier bags which are not compostable.

Read: Etihad Airways Goes Plastic Free For Earth Day

Capri is an island set in the picturesque and naturally stunning bay of Naples, and with an ever increasing pressure on coastal municipalities to target ocean pollution, the government has vowed to step-up and help the global effort.

As an example of a beautiful place which could easily be spoiled from the effects of plastic pollution, Capri’s mayor, Giovanni De Martino, has made it clear that Capri can not avoid participating in the initiative, and that it is not only a bid to keep the tourist areas tidy, but more the non-touristic areas which feel the effects of the pollution most. He wishes to set an example of how the whole world can do their part to stop and reverse the damage.

Local campaign group Legambiente have been pursuing an aggressive campaign of keeping the seas clean – “The Sea Doesn’t Ask, But He Needs You” – and they have praised the efforts of the island in the creation of this new legislation which came into effect from May 1st.

The plastic-free movement has been gaining traction in Capri since around 2012, with large organisations such as Project Aware, a worldwide scuba cleanup operation, and Oceanus, a local non-profit research group collaborating in helping people to move away from single use plastic carrier bags.

Capri is not the only place in Italy to bring such legislation into effect, so if you are planning a trip then please check before you travel so as to avoid any embarrassment or hefty fines. If ending plastic pollution is something that you feel passionate about, then please check up on local clean-ups in the area you are travelling to before you go. Organisations such as 4Ocean, Project Aware, Ocean Conservancy, National Trust and many more offer opportunities to get together with others and tidy up the oceans one piece at a time.

Why not download our episode of Globetrekker – Southern Italy?  

Main Image: Visit to Capri, martin-vmorris, Flickr Creatice Commons

By Sofi Pickering

 

Japan Welcomes New Emperor and New Era

Japan Welcomes New Emperor and New Era

Wednesday morning, upon accession to the Chrysanthemum Throne and following his father’s abdication, Japan’s Emperor Naruhito has pledged to “stand with the nation and maintain the unity of Japan” whilst embarking on a devoted path of self-improvement in a new era which is to become known as the Reiwa Era. His father, Emperor Akihito’s abdication comes after 30 years on the throne and in light of old-age and ill-health.

Emperor Akihito’s reign is synonymous with a period of stable society in Japan despite economic turmoil and natural disasters, and he is known for his closeness to the public. In the 85-year-old’s short statement to the people on Tuesday, Akihito thanked the people and prayed for the peace and happiness of all Japan.

“Today, I am concluding my duties as the Emperor.

I would like to offer my deep gratitude to the words just spoken by Prime Minister Shinzo Abe on behalf of the people of Japan.

Since ascending the throne 30 years ago, I have performed my duties as the Emperor with a deep sense of trust in and respect for the people, and I consider myself most fortunate to have been able to do so. I sincerely thank the people who accepted and supported me in my role as the symbol of the State.

I sincerely wish, together with the Empress, that the Reiwa era, which begins tomorrow, will be a stable and fruitful one, and I pray, with all my heart, for peace and happiness for all the people in Japan and around the world.”

Outside of Japan, it is common to refer to the Japanese Emperor by their given name, however in Japanese culture it is considered impolite to refer to His Imperial Majesty by his given name until such a time where he is no longer a ruling emperor. Emperor Akihito will now be known as His Majesty Emperor Emeritus, which is a name that signifies retirement before the posthumous name can be given. Akihito’s is the first abdication of a Japanese Emperor in over 200 years, and most accessions to the throne occur due to the passing of the incumbent. Japan’s post-war constitution states that an emperor must ‘serve for life’, and so his abdication was no small feat – sources claim he’d been trying to pass on the duties to his son for 9 years. Traditionally, the posthumous name given to the Emperor is the name given to the Era in which he ruled – in Akihito’s case, Heisei, which means “achieving peace”.

Yesterday, in a separate address to the people, Naruhito, His Imperial Majesty The Emperor vowed to continue the duties of Emperor in earnest, and to reflect deeply on the course followed by His Majesty the Emperor Emeritus, and of emperors before him.

“When I think about the important responsibility I have assumed, I am filled with a sense of solemnity.

Looking back, His Majesty the Emperor Emeritus, since acceding to the Throne, performed each of his duties in earnest for more than 30 years, while praying for world peace and the happiness of the people, and at all times sharing in the joys and sorrows of the people. He showed profound compassion through his own bearing. I would like to express my heartfelt respect and appreciation of the comportment shown by His Majesty the Emperor Emeritus as the symbol of the State and of the unity of the people of Japan.

In acceding to the Throne, I swear that I will reflect deeply on the course followed by His Majesty the Emperor Emeritus and bear in mind the path trodden by past emperors, and will devote myself to self-improvement. I also swear that I will act according to the Constitution and fulfill my responsibility as the symbol of the State and of the unity of the people of Japan, while always turning my thoughts to the people and standing with them. I sincerely pray for the happiness of the people and the further development of the nation as well as the peace of the world.”

Emperor Akihito’s ability to connect with the people of Japan in times of disaster will surely be one carried forward by his son. A pacifist, Akihito has spent the last several years quietly questioning Japan’s increasing nationalist conservative movements and maintaining his ideals of post-war peace and individual choice. The role of Emperor is mostly symbolic, however in the case of Akihito, these characteristics earned him much respect from the people of Japan and strengthened the image of the Imperial Family at a time where Royal families across the world are becoming more and more separated from the democratic processes and citizens of their nations.

The Oxford educated Naruhito has throughout his time as Imperial Crown Prince contributed to the efforts of the World Water Council and the United Nations, giving keynote speeches at many of their annual events. His work surrounds the issues of disaster management and water infrastructure for development. Japan has long had universal water supply and sanitation, something that many of it’s neighbours in South East Asia have not yet achieved. Japan also lies at one of the most volatile points of the earth, where the North American, Pacific, Eurasian and Philippine tectonic plates come together creating many problems over the centuries with earthquakes, volcanic eruptions and tsunamis.

Naruhito takes the throne at a time where Japan is the third largest economy in the world. International relations are central to their trading relationships with other large economies, in particular the USA and China. The Emperor plays an important diplomatic role, and he intends to continue his ambassadorial duties in maintaining and forging peaceful relations. He also intends to continue his work in striving to provide global universal clean water and to promote diversity within Japan.

Japan has the oldest hereditary monarchy in the world, dating back to 660BC. To learn more about Japan’s Imperial Family, download and watch our episode of Empire Builders: Japan, or buy the DVD here!

Main image: Natalie Maguire, Imperial Palace, Flickr Creative Commons

By Sofi Pickering

Etihad Airways Goes Plastic Free For Earth Day

Etihad Airways Goes Plastic Free For Earth Day

Etihad Airways, the national airline of the United Arab Emirates, is the first airline in the region to operate an ultra long-haul flight without any single-use plastics on board, in a bid to raise awareness of the effects of plastic pollution. The flight landed in Brisbane on 22 April – Earth Day.

Earth Day is now a global event each year, with over 1 billion people in 192 countries taking part in large-scale civic and political action. 2020 will mark Earth Day’s 50th Anniversary, and with plastic pollution being one of the biggest issues the planet faces, the organisation has committed to a multi-year campaign to eliminate plastic pollution. Since the beginning of the campaign in 2018, consumers and companies alike are broadly committing to the effort, and Etihad’s initiative is a great example of what can be achieved when the world works together to bring about ecological change.

Etihad identified over 95 single-use plastic products used across its aircraft cabins. Once removed from aircraft, Etihad prevented over 50 kilograms of plastics from being sent to landfill in that single flight. The flight is a big part of Etihad’s ongoing commitment to protecting the environment, and the airline has pledged to reduce it’s single-use plastic consumption by 80% by the end of 2022.

H.H. Sheikh Theyab bin Mohamed bin Zayed Al Nahyan, Chairman of the Abu Dhabi Department of Transport said: “Sustainable and efficient transport is core to the government’s vision, and we commend Etihad’s proactivity in paving the way for sustainability and efficiency in air transportation. The investment in sustainable alternative fuels and the focus on emerging environmental concerns such as plastic pollution reaffirms Etihad’s commitment to the Abu Dhabi transport vision.”

Guests on board enjoyed eco-friendly products such as sustainable amenity kits, award-winning eco-thread blankets made out of recycled plastic bottles, tablet toothpaste and edible coffee cups while children were treated to eco-plush toys. Where sustainable alternatives to in-flight amenities could not be sourced, the items instead were withheld from the flight.

As a result of planning the Earth Day flight, Etihad additionally committed to remove up to 20 per cent of the single-use plastic items on board by 1 June 2019. By the end of this year, Etihad will have removed 100 tonnes of single-use plastics from its in flight service.

Tony Douglas, Group Chief Executive Officer, Etihad Aviation Group, said: “There is a growing concern globally about the overuse of plastics which can take thousands of years to decompose. We discovered we could remove 27 million single-use plastic lids from our inflight service a year and, as a leading airline, it’s our responsibility to act on this, to challenge industry standards and work with suppliers who provide lower impact alternatives.”

Why not travel with us to the United Arab Emirates with Globetrekker’s Arab Gulf States?

Main Image: Etihad 787-9, LoadedAaron, Flickr Creative Commons

By Sofi Pickering

Marie Antoinette’s Newly Restored Apartments Open to The Public for the First Time in 3 Years

Marie Antoinette's Newly Restored Apartments Open to The Public for the First Time in 3 Years

After 3 years of renovation at the Chateau de Versailles, Marie Antoinette’s private chambers have been re-opened to the public for viewing.

The renovation, which began in 2016, was carried out in order to ensure the safety and longevity of all of the public collections that the Chateau houses. This included upgrading fire safety, and modernising the climate control which is designed to preserve the collections as well as possible – a technique employed by many museums around the world.

The large scale operation required full closure of the building, and so the Chateau used the opportunity to carry out a heritage restoration of the Queen’s apartments.

The Chateau was the Queen’s official residence alongside French King Louis XVI in the years prior the the French Revolution.

“Thus, the room of the Queen’s Guards has regained the magnificence of its decor, thanks to the patronage of the American Friends of Versailles and the Society of the Friends of Versailles,” the Chateau de Versailles said in a press release. “In the Queen’s room, the restorers were also able to reveal the original appearance of the spectacular rococo decoration, which thus finds all its legibility and virtuosity.”

Some of her furniture remains in their original positions, such as Marie Antoinette’s jewellery cabinet. The Queen was well known for her love of flamboyant jewellery in her younger years, and her collections have since fetched record amounts at auction.

Other pieces were replaced with similar items or remade to look like the original. The tapestries hanging on the bed and walls were re-woven in Lyon using the original patterns. Many of the original pieces had been auctioned off between October 1793 and January 1795 by the new revolutionary government after the abolition of the Monarchy.

The Queen was not known for her popularity amongst her peers or the people, and as a result spent much time away from the Chateau itself, and at her private retreat in the Hameau de la Reine. The French tabloids had long-before chosen Antoinette as their scapegoat in depicting the wrongs in French society, despite her later preference for a more humble existence away from the mischievousness of the Elite Society at the Chateau.

Her attitude was ambiguous at the outbreak of the Revolution, and she seemed uncertain whether to seek reconciliation from the people, or to run away.  Antoinette demonstrated great courage before the Revolutionary Tribunal, and before her execution on 16 October 1793.

To find out more about Court life at the Chateau de Versailles prior to the revolution, please download and enjoy Empire Builders: Kings of Europe: France, The Austro-Hungarians and the Russian Tsars – or order the DVD here!

Main image: Versailles, Kimberley Vardeman, Flickr Creative Commons

By Sofi Pickering

Turkey’s President Seeks To Turn Hagia Sophia Into Mosque

Turkey's President Seeks To Turn Hagia Sophia Into Mosque

Turkey’s President, Tayyip Erdogan, has stated Istanbul’s Hagia Sophia should be re-titled as a mosque instead of a museum.

Hagia Sophia, a UNESCO World Heritage Site, was the foremost cathedral in Christendom for 900 years before becoming one of Islam’s greatest mosques for 500 years until 1935, when it was converted to a museum.

President Erdogan has brought up the issue of Hagia Sophia before. He does not say whether the status of the landmark site will also change.

The United States Commission on International Religious Freedom (USCIRF) has condemned Erdogan’s comments.

“Hagia Sophia bears profound historical and spiritual significance to Muslims and Christians alike, and its status as a museum must be maintained,” USCIRF Chair says in a statement.

The Turkish strongman has provoked strong nationalist and Islamic sentiments during his time in power celebrating in particular the achievements of the country’s Ottoman past.

Watch our Empire Builders – Moslem Empires and Empire Builders – Christian Empires episodes to find out more about the history of Istanbul and its changing religions and cultures.

Golf, Cheating And Trump

Golf, Cheating And Trump

A new book by Rick Reilly, about Donald Trump’s golfing habits, quotes the US President thus: “They cheat, I cheat, I expect you to cheat.”

In the book, “Commander In Cheat-How Golf Explains Trump”, Reilly speaks to caddies, team mates and opponents who give multiple examples of how Trump refuses to allow golfing etiquette or rules to get in the way of becoming a winner.

According to the book, Trump always drives off first, drives his cart on the greens, and wears his hat in the clubhouse, as he lies and cheats his way through false victories on a spectacular scale. Trump claims he plays of a Three Handicap. He is not a bad golfer but according to those who know, his real handicap is about Ten.

As Trump fudges has way to glory we hear of countless instances of cheating – whether it be a Trump giving himself a “gimme “ on a pitch , taking second chances when it suits him or dropping his ball out of water hazards or bushes when no one is looking .

For the most part Trump asks his caddies to do the dirty work. And that doesn’t stop Trump doctoring his scorecard further both in a hole to hole basis, and then back in the clubhouse.

One caddie remarks that Trump’s nickname is Pele, because he is always kicking his ball back on the fairway. Another states: “Trump always has four balls in his pocket – if that tells you anything.”

Reilly remarks: “Golf’s traditions of being your own referee and calling fouls on yourself, clearly has no place in the world of Donald Trump, where it’s all about winning at any cost.”

Watch our Adventure Golf series now!

What’s Happening In New South Wales For 2019

What's Happening In New South Wales For 2019

With a host of exciting electrifying events and a calendar bursting with exciting anniversaries, it’s never been a better year to explore New South Wales.

Holiday-makers visiting in 2019 can take advantage of the array of events across these areas; including Byron Bay’s Bluesfest’s 30th anniversary and the inspiring Vivid Sydney Festival, as well as exploring some of the hottest new hotel openings and tourism experiences.

Home to Australia’s largest and liveliest city, Sydney, and the glorious Bondi Beach, New South Wales also features some of the world’s most beautiful landscapes, from the Blue Mountains and Hunter Valley vineyards to sun-kissed coastlines and endless outback vistas. Please see below for a roundup of some of the State’s most exciting news for 2019.

Vivid Sydney 2019

Australia’s largest festival returns from 24 May – 15 June 2019 to transform the city into a colourful canvas of light, music, ideas and a major celebration of the creative industries. Vivid aims to define the cultural identity of Sydney, with a grand platform for out-of-the-box thinkers, artists, musicians, creative professionals and educators to showcase their talents to local and international audiences. The festival comprises of three main elements; Vivid Light, Vivid Music and Vivid Ideas. Every evening, light installations and projections illuminate Sydney’s most famous sites including the Sydney Opera House, Circular Quay, Royal Botanic Garden Sydney, Darling Harbour and Taronga Zoo.

The Reinvention Of Darling Harbour Continues In 2019

The picturesque Harbourside location has undergone extensive renovations and a vibrant new space packed with unique restaurants, bars and stylish hotels is being revealed.

In 2019, the final touches will be put on the new Darling Square neighbourhood, on the site of the old Entertainment Centre. The Steam Mill Lane dining precinct was the first to be completed and it will be joined by Little Hay Street, a strip of al fresco cafes and shops that links Darling Harbour and Chinatown. Darling Harbour is also set to be the city’s new hotel hub. The high-rise Sofitel Darling Harbour led the way and will soon be joined by Vibe Darling Harbour and the five- star W Sydney in the striking Ribbon Building in 2019 or 2020.

Parramatta Cements Its Position As Sydney’s Second CBD

The west’s most stylish watering hole has recently opened its doors, on the 26th floor of Parramatta’s new V by Crown development. Nick & Nora’s is a 300-seat rooftop bar from The Speakeasy Group (behind Eau de Vie and Mjolner) and is styled like a New York penthouse. There are more than 50 Champagnes on the menu, 300 spirits and cocktails made with liquid nitrogen.

Sports fans will find plenty to love in Western Sydney too. The new £165 million Western Sydney Stadium (which replaced Parramatta Stadium) will be completed in 2019. Its 30,000 seats sit at a 34-degree angle, making it the steepest stadium in the world, and there are lots of high-tech amenities across the ground.

Upgrades Completed To Manly Wharf

sake-manlyPassengers getting off the ferry in 2019 will walk into a completely redeveloped Manly Wharf complex. The $9 million facelift has seen a second storey added and existing facilities upgraded. Saké and El Camino have opened new restaurants on the second floor, joining Merivale’s Queen Chow which took over from Papi Chulo in late 2018. Over on the beach side, the three-level Manly Greenhouse has an Italian restaurant on the ground floor, a grill on the middle level and an open-air rooftop cocktail bar.

Byron Bay Bluesfest Celebrates 30th Anniversary In 2019

Byron Bay Bluesfest, one of Australia’s original outdoor music festivals, is marking its 30th anniversary in 2019. Held over the Easter long weekend, the festival showcases blues and roots music from around the world with more than 200 performances over five days. The anniversary show is set to be the biggest yet, with artists like Jack Johnson, Ben Harper, Ray LaMontagne, Kasey Chambers and George Clinton to perform.

Upgrades To Walking Tracks Along The NSW South Coast

Hikers should plan a trip to the South Coast in 2019 with the completion of a £2.1 million upgrade to the Great Southern Nature Walk in the Royal National Park. Work is also continuing along the Royal Coast Track, which is set to be finished in 2020. An upgrade to Wollongong’s Blue Mile Patch has been completed with the new path linking Belmore Basin where walkers can stop for lunch with the local pelicans and North Wollongong Beach, ideal for families to play in the rockpools and shallow waters.

More Information

Destination New South Wales
Destination New South Wales is the lead government agency for the New South Wales (NSW) tourism.

Halal Tourism On The Rise

Halal Tourism On The Rise

According to analyst Thomson Reuters so-called Halal Tourism, catering exclusively to Moslem tourists, is taking off, particularly in the Mediterranean.

Thomson Reuters says Halal Tourism is expected to almost double in value from 180 billion dollars in 2017 to 280 billion dollars in 2023.

“Halal Only” tourist resorts offer halal prepared food, no alcohol and separate bathing areas for men and women. They also provide prayer rooms and mosques, and broadcast the call to prayer five times a day over hotel public address systems.

Halal Tourism is still largely focused on the Gulf region and traditional Moslem holiday destinations such as Malaysia, Nigeria, Russia, Iran and Indonesia. But now more and more hotels on Turkey’s Turquoise Coast are also offering Halal holidays and first resorts have also opened on Spain’s Costa del Sol.

According to halalbooking.com, Halal-friendly holidays are a response to a growing Moslem middle class.

Soumaya Hamid, who runs the online Halal Travel Guide, said: “The last 10 years have been about meeting the basic needs of Moslem travellers. The next stage is to take it further to new destinations and authentic experiences.”

Read our Middle East & North Africa destination guide for tips, articles and episodes galore on this one-of-a-kind destination!

The Average 40-Something Still Has 7 Countries To Visit On Their Bucket List

The Average 40-Something Still Has 7 Countries To Visit On Their Bucket List

The average 40-something still has seven countries to visit on their travel bucket list, a study has found.

A poll of 2,000 adults aged 40 and above revealed travel is not just the domain of the young, with middle-aged Brits still working their way through a wishlist of destinations.

In fact, those polled have only travelled to a quarter of the countries they dream of visiting with popular backpacking destinations New Zealand, Canada and Australia top of the list.

It also emerged more than six in 10 have already got at least one trip abroad booked for 2019.

But three in 10 reckon they are more ‘adventurous’ with their holiday choices now than they ever used to be, with 38% preferring to go off the beaten track when they travel abroad. And rather than sitting by the pool, a fifth have tried snorkelling on a trip abroad while more than one in 10 have been on a safari.

The study also found nearly half of over 40s go on more holidays now than at any other point of their lives, with six in 10 putting this down to having more money than they did in the past.

And a quarter think it’s easier to get away because their kids are older, while 46% have more time, according to the research carried out via OnePoll.

Another 40% think their lives are simpler now, giving them more freedom to travel the globe.

It also emerged more than one in five adults aged 40 and above have also ‘gone travelling’, taking a month or more off work to visit different countries.

Top 20 countries on the wishlists of over 40s

1. New Zealand
2. Canada
3. Australia
4. Mainland USA
5. Italy
6. The Caribbean
7. Hawaii
8. Japan
9. Maldives
10. Greece
11. Spain
12. Portugal
13. France
14. Austria
15. Thailand
16. Germany
17. India
18. Singapore
19. Holland
20. China

First Mammal Species Recognised As Extinct Due To Climate Change

First Mammal Species Recognised As Extinct Due To Climate Change

The government of Australia has officially recognised the Bramble Coy melomys as extinct. The small rodent, found solely on a single island in the Eastern Torres Strait of the Great Barrier Reef, is the world’s first mammal to become a casualty of climate change.

Bramble Cay, the name of both the animal and its home, is at most only 10 feet above sea level. Since 1998, the section of the island that sits above high tide has shrunk from 3.9 hectares to 2.5 hectares – the rodents therefore losing approximatively 97% of their habitat.

The animal was last seen by a fisherman in 2009 and failed attempts to it down in 2014 led scientists to believe it was likely extinct.

“The key factor responsible for the extirpation of this population was almost certainly ocean inundation of the low-lying cay, very likely on multiple occasions, during the last decade, causing dramatic habitat loss and perhaps also direct mortality of individuals,” claimed a state government report.

The loss of an animal little known in the public mind has caused sadness and regret in Australia and abroad.

“The Bramble Cay melomys was a little brown rat,” said Tim Beshara, a spokesman for advocacy group The Wilderness Society.

“But it was our little brown rat and it was our responsibility to make sure it persisted. And we failed.”

By Natarsha Brown