Travel in the COVID-Zone

Travel in the COVID-Zone

Cardiff named UK’s most bike friendly city

Following the cycling booms that occurred during lockdowns right the way across Europe, Cardiff in Wales has been named the UK’s most bike friendly city by route-finding app Komoot!

Participants were asked to rate a range of factors including cycling infrastructure, such as cycle lanes and signage, local cycling facilities, countryside accessibility and their sense of personal safety when it comes to cycling in the city.

The Food of Quarantine

The BBC took a look at the kind of foods being delivered to the rooms of those quarantining around the world. Spoiler: It largely resembles a cross between plane food, hospital food and a classic British school dinner… Yum?

Let us know on Twitter if you experienced this kind of quarantine food and what you thought of it!

Other Coronavirus News & Statistics


Main image: Cardiff Ajax and Arbis heading for top 10s, Jun, Flickr Creative Commons

Borderlines: Stop the Spread!

Borderlines: Stop the Spread!

Following the emergence of an allegedly more contagious strain of COVID-19, multiple nations have put the shutters down with the UK.

After a hard year of restrictions of varying degrees, in places all around the globe, it is time to revisit the ever changing history of the world’s borders and barriers!

This episode of the Globe Guides explores the theme of Borderlines!

From Historic walled cities such as Fez and Jerusalem, to divided capitals such as Berlin and Nicosia, this show uncovers the history behind these division and the reason why many of them remain to this day.

Megan McCormick visits the Great Wall of China while Ian Wright takes a trip to the DMZ in Korea. Justine Shapiro and Megan both learn about the history and future of the Berlin wall in Germany, while Zay Harding see one of the world’s most recently constructed walls, the West Bank barrier, and learns about the effect that its construction has caused.

Listen to our podcast here!

In London…

London has found itself locked down over the Christmas period, with trips to leave the capital to now be prohibited.

In the rest of the UK…

The UK has found itself in a spot of bother with its European neighbours this week after scientists claim to have discovered a strain of much more highly transmissible COVID-19.


Main image: Guardians – Downing Street, Phil Dolby, Flickr Creative Commons

Travel in the COVID-Zone

Travel in the COVID-Zone

China asks cabin crew to wear nappies

In a bizarre bid to reduce the risk of virus transmission, the Chinese aviation authorities have asked the cabin crew on certain Chinese charter flights to wear nappies!

The rule, as set out by China’s latest 49-page set of guidelines, applies to charter flights heading to and from destinations with infection rates of 500 per million.

Other advice put forward includes for cabin crew to wear full Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) such as masks, goggles and shoe covers.

The crew of flights on regular schedules don’t have to wear nappies, though multiple forms of protective gear are being employed by a variety of airlines, depending on their destinations.

Read: Phobic Traveller: The Next Chapter for Air Travel

Vaccines hit the ground running!

Healthcare providers in the United Kingdom, Canada and the United States among others have ramped up efforts to vaccinate vulnerable people against the Coronavirus since a number of vaccines, each from different pharmaceutical companies and research teams, have been approved for use.

Meanwhile, the so-called COVAX initiative has set out to help provide poorer nations with a share of the global supply.

Run, Forrest! Run!

More Coronavirus News & Statistics

  • Europe tightens COVID restrictions ahead of Christmas. Germany will return to a national lockdown until January 10th, but with the restrictions relaxed slightly from 24 to 26 December, allowing a limited amount of festive household mixing.
  • Worldometers: Up to date Coronavirus statistics

Main image: B-18007 China Airlines with special Boeing livery Boeing 777-309(ER) coming in from Taipei (TPE) @ Frankfurt (FRA) / 01.06.2018, Oliver Holzbauer, Flickr Creative Commons

Travel in the COVID-Zone

Travel in the COVID-Zone

Travel, Explore, Defer?

For most of the northern hemisphere, this time of year marks the start of a new academic year, and for many students this means upping sticks and moving to a new house, city and sometimes even country!

As with many other things over the past few months, the coronavirus has now put pay to this year’s foreign cohorts. A report conducted by Ernst & Young estimates that only about 330,000 foreigners are studying in Britain, the US, Canada, Australia and New Zealand this year, down from 1.09 million in 2019.

However, they also predict that 2021 will see up to 1.85 million people starting degrees in foreign countries, as those who deferred this year resume their studies.

Why not check out our free Study Guides?

In the UK, Cambridge University has said it will be only conducting online teaching for the duration of the new acadmeic year, deferring the arrival of over 20,000 students to the city, which usually make up around a sixth of the entire city’s population!

Meanwhile, Harvard’s 2020 freshmen have arrived on campus in a socially distanced manner, with most student expressing relief at having made it, and a little disappointment at the lack of buzz about the Yard. In past weeks, the New York Times has tracked thousands of cases that were linked to students returning to campuses across the nation.

Hope and Fear: How Pandemics Changed the World

Our latest documentary explores the impact on our planet of viral diseases across the ages.

COVID-19, which struck with such devastating impact in the early months of 2020, is just the latest in a long line of pandemics that have devastated, and in some cases, destroyed societies throughout time.

Like all pandemics, COVID-19 was sparked by human interaction with the animal world.

“Hope and Fear: How Pandemics Changed the World” looks at the circumstances that have caused these diseases – whether it be hygiene, poverty, overcrowding, urbanisation or the growth of cities – and how travel has impacted on their rapid transmission resulting in pandemics.

Other Coronavirus News & Statistics

  • The University of Georgia has advised its students to wear face masks during sex. In a COVID pamphlet, it said: “Consider wearing a face mask during sex. Heavy breathing and panting can further spread the virus, and wearing a mask can reduce the risk.”
  • British Prime Minister Boris Johnson is leading by example and has been spotted exercising in a bid to shed his excess pounds after asking the nation to do the same. In 2018, 63% of adults in the UK were overweight or obese, and 20.2% of children aged 11 were obese. It is understood that being overweight puts you at risk of becoming seriously ill with the COVID-19 virus, along with multiple other health complications.
  • Worldometers: Up to date Coronavirus statistics

Main image: Cambridge University, Mark Fosh, Flickr Creative Commons

Travel in the COVID-Zone

Travel in the COVID-Zone
June 24, 2020

Japan Launches Worlds Most Powerful Supercomputer To Find Cure

Japan’s new so-called ‘Fugaku’ supercomputer, which has this week been declared the most powerful in the world, is to be used to search for a potential cure for the coronavirus.

The machine is capable of performing 513 quadrillion complicated mathematical operations every second. Fugaku requires 28 megawatts to run – more than two Eurostar trains!

Although it won’t be fully operational until next year, the team leading the project have already used it to run simulations on how cough and sneeze droplets spread through office spaces and public transport.

The White House’s expert on infectious diseases has warned the US is experiencing a “disturbing surge” in coronavirus cases.

Infectious diseases specialist Dr Fauci has highlighted recent spikes in states such as Florida and Texas, which are largely reopening businesses despite reporting thousands of cases per day.

Dr Fauci’s comments come following President Trump’s apparent desire to slow testing in order to slow the reporting of new cases.

Speaking at a campaign rally on Saturday, the President remarked: “When you do testing to that extent, you’re going to find more people, you’re going to find more cases,” the president said. “So I said to my people, ‘Slow the testing down, please.’ They test and they test.”

Latest Coronavirus News & Statistics

  • IMF expects global economic activity to decline by 5% in 2020, owing to the damage caused by large scale economic shut downs and the compromises that must be made by surviving businesses away from efficiency and in favour of heightened workplace safety and hygiene measures.
  • Pubs, cafes and restaurants in England will be allowed to reopen on 4 July.The government and the industry hope that gyms can reopen in mid-July, subject to health guidance.
  • A sharp increase in cases in Latin America in the second half of May led the World Health Organization (WHO) to warn that the Americas were the new centre of the pandemic. But there have also been new spikes in Africa, Asia and the Middle East.
  • Worldometers: Up to date Coronavirus statistics

Main image: Discover Supercomputer 3, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Flickr Creative Commons