Rare White Giraffes Slaughtered by Poachers in Kenya

Rare White Giraffes Slaughtered by Poachers in Kenya

Two white giraffes – one of which was the last female in the world – have been found killed by poachers in a nature reserve in Kenya.

It is believed that there is only one white giraffe left in the world. The white colouring occurs due to a rare condition called leucism, which causes skin cells to have no pigmentation. Unlike albinism, animals with leucism still produce dark pigment in soft tissues, meaning that the eyes of these giraffe were dark.

The stunning white giraffes have previously attracted much tourism to the nature reserves. The killings have also provided a blow to greater conservation efforts that are designed to protect rare and unique species.

Scientists had also been studying the genetics of the white giraffes since their ‘discovery’ in 2016, providing a further boost to the local economy.

“This is a very sad day for the community of Ijara and Kenya as a whole,” said Mohammed Ahmednoor, manager of the Ishaqbini Community Conservancy working with the Hirola Conservation Program.

Poachers kill or capture animals to sell them locally or for the global trade in wildlife. Wildlife trading is a major black market that has increased alongside rising wealth in Asia—a major consumer of wildlife—and the advent of e-commerce and social media websites.

International anti-poaching organisations such as the World Wildlife FundThe International Anti-Poaching Foundation and Save The Elephants have been working hard for many years to combat the issue. Organisations such as these often work alongside local-level initiatives such as the Hirola Conservation Program.

More information:

Read: You’ve Probably Never Heard Of The World’s Most Trafficked Animal

Read: Breeding endangered species at La Vanille Crocodile Park

Main Image: Sunset in Kenya, susanjanegolding, Flickr Creative Commons

By Sofi Summers

Rare Mouse-Deer Caught on Camera in Vietnam

Rare Mouse-Deer Caught on Camera in Vietnam

One of our greatest pleasures is discovering cute, exotic animals that we never knew existed, and this Mouse-deer is no exception. Especially considering nobody has seen one since the 90’s!

‘Chevrotain’ otherwise known as mouse-deer (though not belonging to either family), are the smallest hoofed mammals in the world, originating in forests in South and South-East Asia, and forested parts of West Africa. The Silver-Backed Chevrotain is native to Vietnam and had not been sighted for around 30 years – until now.

The Vietnamese Chevrotain had made it onto the Global Wildlife Web Size-5_Silver-Backed-Chevrotain_whiteConservation’s 25 most wanted missing species list, with specialists unsure as to whether these creatures had become extinct.

Chevrotain originating in Asia can weigh between 0.7 and 8.0 kg. In other words, their size ranges from a small Guinea Pig up to a Jack Russell dog. They lack antlers or horns, but have long canine teeth used for fighting. Chevrotain live mostly on plants, live in couples and give birth to one (very cute) baby Chevrotain at at time.

Cameras were set in forested areas by zoologists in order to find out, and fortunately there were multiple sightings of the mousy-looking critter. The Silver-Backed Chevrotain is the first of 25 missing species that the organisation hopes to find.

Global Wildlife ConservationGlobal Wildlife Conservation

Main Image: Global Wildlife Conservation