Most Instagrammable spots along the Mediterranean coastline

Most Instagrammable spots along the Mediterranean coastline

Set along 28,000 miles of beautiful coastline, there’s a magnitude of opportunity for avid photographers to capture scenes of turquoise waters, secluded landscapes and historical sites in the Mediterranean. To help those deciding where on this famous coastline they want to snap next, read on for the most Instagram-worthy locations.

Kassiopi, Greece

Situated on the affluent north coast of Corfu, the popular horseshoe bay of Kassiopi is relaxed by day – perfect for a snorkel in the shallow shingle bay – yet close to the heart of the village, which comes alive at night. The village itself is steeped in history, with Emperor Nero and Cicero some of its ancient visitors. Nowadays, the village has transformed into something of a luxury hotspot, with stunning blue coastal views by day and the twinkling lights of tavernas creating a buzz at night.

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Loviste, Croatia

This little town on the Peljesac peninsula, far away from the light pollution of large cities and tourist hotspots, is the perfect spot to unwind and capture some great snaps. Enjoy the calm, warmer waters of the bay by paddleboard before spending a night stargazing from the beach.

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Fethiye, Turquise Coast, Turkey

Turkey’s Turquoise Coast has quite the history; legend has it that Marc Anthony declared the whole coast as a gift for his lover, Cleopatra. Discover the area both underwater and from the sky; with ancient ruins to snorkel and the famous Oludeniz beach to paraglide above, these glistening turquoise waters are an Instagrammer’s dream.

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Diamond Bay, Croatia

Hidden away on Vis Island, Diamond Bay is home to the crystal clear waters of Stiniva Cove and the ancient Blue Grotto. Paddle into the caves to experience deep blue caverns teeming with sea life. Film buffs may also recognise the island’s quaint villages and golden orchards from Mamma Mia 2.

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Hydra, Greece

Named after the natural springs found across the island, Hydra is a rustic gem. Vehicles are banned on the island, so donkeys remain the most popular method of transport and the pristine forests that line the beaches are not to be missed. With many beaches only accessible by boat, Hydra is the perfect destination to watch the sunset in solitude.

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Cala Junco, Italy

Located on the most beautiful of the Aeolian Islands, Panarea is the home of Cala Junco, a stony shored beach with crystal clear waters, rocky outlets and hidden coves to discover. A short ride away from neighbouring towns that are popular with the yachting elite, Cala Junco gives a taste of Italian luxury, without the matching price tag. Head into town for fashionable Italian boutiques and to rub shoulders with Uma Thurman, Naomi Campbell, The Dolce and Gabanna designers, all famous fans of this beautiful island.

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More information

Med Sailors
Offering balanced sailing holidays in the Mediterranean, MedSailors create seven-day trips for 20-35 year olds in Croatia, Greece, Turkey, Italy and Antigua. Trips are created to offer authentic, memorable experiences while providing holidaymakers the opportunity to relax and, if they want to, learn new skills.

All images © Med Sailors

Want know more about all things Mediterranean? Read our diverse range of articles below.

Brits vote for the top 20 British bucket list experiences

Brits vote for the top 20 British bucket list experiences

Seeing Giant’s Causeway, whale watching in Scotland and visiting the Roman Baths have emerged among a list of British bucket list aspirations, a study has found. Spending the day at the Wimbledon tennis tournament, walking along Hadrian’s Wall and celebrating the summer solstice at Stonehenge also featured. A number of other quintessentially British experiences made it on to the list of must-dos, including enjoying a clotted cream tea in Cornwall and staying in a thatched cottage in the Cotswolds.

Despite these dreams, the survey of 2,000 adults commissioned by Sykes Holiday Cottages, revealed just how unexplored the UK really is, as Brits are more likely to have visited France, Spain and Italy than England’s home counties. According to the stats more than 6 in 10 (63%) have spent time in Spain, compared to just a third who’ve been to Surrey. And more Brits have visited France (67%) than Cornwall, Manchester and even London. In fact, the same number of us have travelled across the globe to Australia as those who have been across the border to Aberdeenshire (16%)!

And although Giant’s Causeway tops Brits’ home-based bucket list, only a quarter of the nation have visited Northern Ireland, where it’s located.

Graham Donoghue, CEO at Sykes Holiday Cottages, said: “Despite a desire to tick off our British bucket list experiences, these results show how undiscovered the country actually is. Lots of us are more likely to get on a plane or a ferry and go abroad than take in everything the UK has to offer. Although it’s brilliant to travel to other countries and cultures, many people would be surprised at how much there is to see just a hundred miles away from their hometown – Britain isn’t called great for nothing!”

The study also found that the average Brit has visited just 15 out of nearly 50 counties in the UK – although more than 1 in 10 (11%) admit they’ve been to a maximum of three. In comparison, the average person has travelled to 10 different countries around the world.

The north-south divide is also ever-apparent in Brits’ travel choices, as almost 1 in 5 southerners said they’ve never ventured up north. And nearly half (48%) of the population of Wales and Scotland haven’t ever been to each other’s country.

The decision to holiday abroad must be affecting our knowledge of the UK, as a 10th of Brits think Land’s End is in Scotland – when that couldn’t be further from its location at the very foot of Cornwall. A further 12% think the Brecon Beacons is in Scotland, and 6% are even convinced that London is in the north west of the country.

Brits’ top 20 British bucket list experiences:

  1. Visit Giant’s Causeway
  2. Go whale watching in the Scottish Highlands
  3. Visit Bath’s Roman Baths
  4. Walk along Hadrian’s Wall
  5. See in the summer solstice at Stonehenge
  6. Spend a day at Wimbledon
  7. Enjoy a clotted cream tea in Cornwall
  8. Stay in a thatched cottage in the Cotswolds
  9. Visit the Edinburgh Festival
  10. Visit Buckingham Palace
  11. Watch a show on London’s West End
  12. See the White Cliffs of Dover
  13. Eat fresh fish and chips in Whitby
  14. Walk through Cheddar Gorge
  15. Climb Mount Snowdon
  16. Take a boat trip on Lake Windermere
  17. Stargazing in Northumberland
  18. See the crown jewels at the Tower of London
  19. Look for Nessie at Loch Ness
  20. Search for fossils on the Jurassic Coast

Read our array of travel articles about the above destinations to start planning your next English adventure now:

Travel to Finland on the rise: Helsinki Airport breaks another record

Travel to Finland on the rise: Helsinki Airport breaks another record

Air travel via Helsinki Airport has been growing rapidly over the past few years. A historical milestone was surpassed today as the 20 millionth passenger of 2018 visited the airport.

“This is a momentous occasion for Helsinki Airport and the entire Finnish aviation industry,” says Joni Sundelin, Director of Helsinki Airport.

“The number of passengers has been growing faster than we predicted a few years ago. Back then, we talked about 20 million passengers in 2020. However, we hit that mark already this year.”

Up to 21 million passengers are expected to visit Helsinki Airport by the end of the year. The corresponding figure last year was 18.9 million passengers.

Sundelin says that responsibility is a key factor in the growth of Helsinki Airport. “We do our best to ensure that the volume air traffic can grow responsibly. Helsinki Airport is already a carbon neutral airport. We use renewable energy and fuels and compensate for other emissions.”

The volume of international transit traffic is increasing rapidly

The increasing number of passengers is due to the growth of international transit traffic, the attractiveness of Finland as a travel destination and Finns’ increased tendency to travel by plane.

“All areas of our operations have grown. The majority of traffic is still within Europe, but Asian transit traffic, in particular, has been growing more rapidly than expected.”

The growth of international traffic at Helsinki Airport has continued to be stronger than at the other main Nordic airports.

“We are currently among the most rapidly growing air traffic hubs in Europe. We have established our status as a hub of transit traffic between Europe and Asia.”

Finavia works arduously on getting new routes and airlines to use its airports. The main airlines, Finnair and Norwegian, have increased their range of services considerably this year. In addition, the airport has secured new airlines as its clients. FlyDubai, for example, began operating daily flights to Helsinki.

“Hopefully, we will continue to acquire more clients next year,” says Sundelin.

“We expect Helsinki Airport to continue its strong growth, but we also assume that the rate of growth will become more moderate in the coming years.”

A frantic year of development coming up at Helsinki Airport in 2019

The rapid rate of growth at Helsinki Airport is, of course, a positive sign, but the rapidly increasing number of passengers also sets certain challenges for the capacity of the airport. That is why, already in 2014, Finavia initiated a €1 billion development programme that is helping Helsinki Airport to prepare for serving up to 30 million passengers a year.

“The next year of the development programme will be very remarkable. In February, we will open the new heart of long-distance traffic, Aukio, and later on, the expansions of the west pier, border control and Terminal 1 will be opened,” says Sundelin.

The construction of the new entrance to Terminal 2 and the new departure and arrivals halls will also begin in early 2019. Passengers will have to take the construction work into account when arriving at and leaving the airport.

“The new premises of Helsinki Airport and the entire customer experience of passengers will be world-class. Nevertheless, we need to focus on maintaining the level of customer satisfaction during the construction work,” says Sundelin.

More Information

Finavia
Finavia provides and develops airport services with a focus on safety, customer-orientation and cost efficiency in Finland.

Ever heard of Finland’s Wife Carrying Festival? Watch Neil Gibson buckle under the pressure of this once gimmick, now national institution in the episode below, July Globe Guide.

Egypt upset by ignored obelisk gifted to Britain 200 years ago

Egypt upset by ignored obelisk gifted to Britain 200 years ago

The Economist has reported that Egyptian authorities are upset at Britain’s seeming indifference to a gift presented to the country 200 years ago.

It’s a giant 3500-year-old obelisk that sits unloved in an obscure section of the Embankment in London .

The Egyptian Antiquities Department now says that unless Britain shows greater appreciation and care of the monument, they should give it back.

Western powers, going right back to the Roman Empire, sought out and often plundered Egyptian obelisks. They can be found centre stage in a number of European capitals including Paris and Rome.

But the Egyptians say London’s Egyptian obelisk has been poorly maintained and ignored. Bomb damage in the Second World War wasn’t even repaired .

Check out our stories on Egypt’s spectacular obelisks in Empire Builders: Ancient Egyptians, Empire Builders: The Roman Empire and Tough Boats: Egypt Down the Nile.

Finland now has a zero cabin! Meet Nolla: The cabin that was never there

Finland now has a zero cabin! Meet Nolla: The cabin that was never there

This summer, living with minimal emissions will be put to the test. Neste is building a prototype of a cabin that has a minimal environmental impact in terms of both carbon dioxide emissions and concrete impact on nature. The Nolla (= zero) cabin, designed by Finnish designer Robin Falck, is located just outside Helsinki city centre, on the Vallisaari island. The cabin has been built from sustainable materials and is designed for a simple lifestyle with minimal to no emissions, taking into account the surrounding nature in every respect.

5_nollaLocated on the idyllic island of Vallisaari in the Helsinki archipelago, the Nolla cabin encourages people to consider how modern solutions and innovations could enable sustainable cabin living. Vallisaari has been in a natural state for decades and is thus the perfect location for an urban cabin experience, located just a 20-minute boat ride away from the Helsinki market square.

The ecological and mobile Nolla cabin will be in Vallisaari until the end of September, demonstrating a lifestyle that generates minimal to no emissions.

Placing the compact and mobile cabin on its private lot does not require a construction permit and it has been designed to use building materials as effectively as possible. The cabin is the size of a small bedroom and can be assembled and transported without heavy machinery, leaving its environment nearly untouched. The Nolla cabin has been designed by Finnish designer Robin Falck, whose earlier design, Nido cabin, has been globally acknowledged.

7_nollaThe Nolla cabin introduces solutions, which enable minimising cabin life emissions remarkably. The energy supply of the cabin is entirely renewable; electricity is generated by solar panels, while the Wallas stove, reserved for cooking and heating, runs entirely on Neste MY Renewable Diesel, made 100% from waste and residue. The Aava Lines raft operating between Helsinki city centre and Vallisaari will also run on Neste MY Renewable diesel that can reduce greenhouse gas emissions by up to 90%.

“With the Nolla cabin, we want to offer visitors the possibility to experience modern cabin life in the realm of nature, with minimal emissions. An ecological lifestyle does not only require giving up unsustainable commodities, but also discovering modern, sustainable solutions that can be used instead. This has been an essential part of the design process”, says Falck.

“Finns are known for spending time at their beloved summer houses. We wanted to explore sustainable solutions that could enable cabin life with minimal emissions. Shared and circular economy, as well as new technologies and innovations have made it possible to enjoy our cabins without harming or burdening the environment. Some of the solutions that have been used at the Nolla cabin are perfectly adaptable at any cabin”, says Sirpa Tuomi, Marketing Director at Neste.

The Nolla cabin is executed in collaboration with Fortum, Wallas and Stockmann and is part of the Journey to Zero project by Neste, which explores new ideas and aims to steer the world towards a cleaner future with fewer emissions.

The #nolla cabin in a nutshell

1_nollaDesigner: Robin Falck

Dimensions: Height 4m, width 3.75m

Materials: Main material plywood, the floor has been coated with a non-toxic, water-soluble varnish

Energy supply: Fortum solar panels

Heating: Fortum solar panels, Wallas, Neste MY Renewable Diesel

Weight: 900 kg

Decor: Stockmann Sustainable Collection

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The Nolla cabin by Neste

Museum dedicated to Yves Saint Laurent opens in Marrakech

Museum dedicated to Yves Saint Laurent opens in Marrakech

In October of last year, a museum dedicated to renowned fashion designer Yves Saint Laurent opened in Marrakech, a city he discovered in 1966 and visited regularly till his death in 2008.

Laurent’s love of Morocco is well documented and the ‘Red City’ especially served as a major inspiration, him once stating “Marrakech taught me colour”. The museum itself is situated near sites of great importance to the designer, including Jardin Majorelle, a garden that he and business partner Pierre Berge saved from development in 1980, and the villa that Laurent bought to continue his visits to Morocco.

A unique view of the gardens

A unique view of the gardens

The opening of the new museum coincided with that of Musée Yves Saint Laurent Paris, which was constructed inside 5 Avenue Marceau, the couture house that Saint Laurent worked his magic for nearly 30 years and which will showcase the creative process used by Laurent to design his most famous pieces.

The Marrakech museum compliments its Parisian counterpart by showcasing a private collection of Laurent’s work with over 5,000 pieces of clothing, including his famous smoking jackets, as well as rotating temporary exhibitions. The museum also reconstructs memories of Laurent’s personal life, with exhibitions including dialogues from the designer himself, magazine clippings, press releases and photographs.

The museum is not solely focused on Laurent; amongst the temporary exhibits are collections from varied – often young and upcoming – designers, such as Moroccan local Noureddine Amir. In addition to the exhibit spaces, the museum building includes a terrace café, research library and auditorium. It also includes a fantastic museum dedicated to Berber culture. Located in the former painting studio of Jacques Majorelle, this section includes more than 600 objects from the Rif to the Sahara Desert, collected by Pierre Bergé and Yves Saint Laurent, which demonstrate the richness and diversity of this still-vibrant culture.

More Information

Musée Yves Saint Laurent Marrakech

Words by Aranya Tatapudi

 

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