Hiking Across Molokai

Molokai is one of the central Hawaiian islands, 2500 miles from the U.S. mainland. The island is only ten miles wide, but has a complete range of ecosystems - from dry arid desert-like plains on the west side, to an incredibly lush jungle forest and high waterfalls on the island's east coast.

Hiking Across Molokai

 

Trek Essentials

image: Cristina LaMonica with a hula dancer

Cristina LaMonica with a hula dancer

Where: The Hawaiian island of Molokai
Best Season: Any time avoiding high summer
Best Sights: Varied ecosystem from dry arid desert-like plains to a lush jungle forest and high waterfalls
Remember to Bring: Waterproofs
Watch out for: Pesky mosquitos

Highlights

– Learning about the ancient art of Hula.
– Fishing for your breakfast in the warm morning sunshine.
– Swimming in the warm Moa’ula Falls in the Halawa Valley.

Where it’s at

Molokai is one of the central Hawaiian islands, 2500 miles from the U.S. mainland. The island is only ten miles wide, but image; molokai maphas a complete range of ecosystems – from dry arid desert-like plains on the west side, to an incredibly lush jungle forest and high waterfalls on the island’s east coast. It’s a great place for a fairly easy going trek, and along the way, you’re bound to meet some friendly local Hawaiian people – all ready to tell you more about the beauty and culture of their beautiful island.

Our journey path

image: Cristina LaMonica's journey route

Cristina LaMonica’s journey route

In this trek, Cristina LaMonica hikes across the entire 38 mile length of the island of Molokai. Starting on the west side of the island, at the Molokai Ranch, she heads north to Kalaupapa, visiting the Peko stone along the way, a place where Hawaiian mothers used to (and still do!) bring the umbilical cords of their new-born babies. From here, Cristina and her guide Lawrence continue north see the highest sea cliffs in the world, at 3300 feet.
The only way through the jungle from the sea-cliffs is to trek south again, back to the south coast and east to the gorgeous Halawa Valley, where Cristina discovered the Moa’ula Falls, one of the most beautiful and lush spots on the island.

Survival tips

– While there aren’t any poisonous creepy-crawlies to contend with, Molokai does have its fair share of annoying mosquitoes. They don’t carry malaria, but they are a nuisance, so bring along some good repellent to keep them at bay.

– Rain is something that you’ll have to contend with on Molokai. The average annual rainfall, especially on the east side of the island, is 27 inches. Make sure you bring rainproof gear!

Did you know?

– Molokai is considered to be the most ‘Hawaiian’ of all the islands. While there are only 7000 people who live on Molokai, and fifty percent of them can claim native Hawaiian ancestry.

– Hawaiians believe that Molokai is the child of Hina, the goddess of the moon.

– Visiting the Peko stone is a must on any trip to Molokai. It’s an important historical site for Hawaiian people. To you and me, it might just look like a rock, but from ancient times Hawaiian people would bring the umbilical cords from their new-born babies to the stone and leave it in the crevasses in the rock. This symbolises a deep connection with the earth that is very relevant to Hawaiian culture and belief even today.

– The phallic stone that Cristina visits on this trek is called Kauleonanahoa, literally ‘the penis of Nanahoa’. It’s said that women who bring offerings and spend the night here will conceive a child.

– Molokai Ranch, on Molokai’s west side, is Hawaii’s second largest ranch with 54,000 acres. Founded over a century ago, it makes a great base for exploring this fascinating island.

 

MORE INFORMATION

Molokai Ranch
P.O. Box 259
Maunaloa,
Molokai, Hawaii
96770 USA
Toll free: 1-877 PANIOLO (726-4656)

Aloha Airlines
Aloha Airlines has regularly schedule flights to Molokai from other Hawaiian island destinations, including Honolulu.

Maui Visitors Bureau
The government tourist board that deals with Molokai.

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